Health knowledge made personal
Join this community!
› Share page:
Go
Search posts:

Paternal occupational exposure and retinoblastoma?

Posted Nov 04 2009 10:03pm

To examine the association between paternal occupational exposures and retinoblastoma using birth registration data a case–control study was carried out.  For 1318 cases of retinoblastoma, born and diagnosed in Great Britain between 1962 and 1999, and 1318 controls matched on sex, date of birth and birth registration sub-district paternal occupations at birth were grouped according to inferred exposure using an occupational exposure classification scheme.

For non-heritable retinoblastoma, a statistically significant increased risk was found with father’s definite occupational exposure to oil mists in metal working (OR = 1.85 (95% CI 1.05 to 3.36)). No statistically significant associations were observed for other exposure groups.

Overall, our findings do not support the hypothesis that paternal occupational exposure is an important aetiological factor for retinoblastoma, however, the study has low power and other methodological limitations.

Paternal occupation and retinoblastoma: a case–control study based on data for Great Britain 1962–1999
A MacCarthy, K J Bunch1, N T Fear2, J C King, T J Vincent1, M F G Murphy Occupational and Environmental Medicine 2009; 66:644-649  Read More…

To examine the association between paternal occupational exposures and retinoblastoma using birth registration data a case–control study was carried out.  For 1318 cases of retinoblastoma, born and diagnosed in Great Britain between 1962 and 1999, and 1318 controls matched on sex, date of birth and birth registration sub-district paternal occupations at birth were grouped according to inferred exposure using an occupational exposure classification scheme.

For non-heritable retinoblastoma, a statistically significant increased risk was found with father’s definite occupational exposure to oil mists in metal working (OR = 1.85 (95% CI 1.05 to 3.36)). No statistically significant associations were observed for other exposure groups.

Overall, our findings do not support the hypothesis that paternal occupational exposure is an important aetiological factor for retinoblastoma, however, the study has low power and other methodological limitations.

Paternal occupation and retinoblastoma: a case–control study based on data for Great Britain 1962–1999
A MacCarthy, K J Bunch1, N T Fear2, J C King, T J Vincent1, M F G Murphy Occupational and Environmental Medicine 2009; 66:644-649  Read More…

Post a comment
Write a comment:

Related Searches