Health knowledge made personal
Join this community!
› Share page:
Go
Search posts:

Paid employment no risk for pregnancy complications

Posted Feb 05 2010 10:37am

Within the Dutch Generation R study the relation between employment statustype of unemployment and number of weekly working hours with a wide range of pregnancy outcomes was explored. Information on employment characteristics and pregnancy outcomes was available for 6111 pregnant women. No indications were found that paid employment during pregnancy benefits or endangers the health of mother and child. Within the subgroups of unemployed and employed women we observedhoweverthat women receiving disability benefitstudents and women with long working hours during pregnancy were at risk for some adverse pregnancy outcomes.

Employment status and the risk of pregnancy complications. The Generation R Study
Pauline Jansen*Henning TiemeierFrank VerhulstAlex BurdorfVincent JaddoeAlbert HofmanHenriette MollBero VerburgEric SteegersJohan MackenbachHein Raat
Occup Environ Med doi:10.1136/oem.2009.046300

Abstract

Objectives: The association between employment status during pregnancy and pregnancy outcome remains unclear. Therefore this study explored the relation between employment statustype of unemployment and number of weekly working hourswith a wide range of pregnancy outcomes.

Methods: The study was embedded within a population-based cohort study in the Netherlands. Information on employment characteristics and pregnancy outcomes was available for 6111 pregnant women.

Results: After adjustment for confoundersthere were no statistically significant differences in risks of pregnancy complications between employed and unemployed women. In the subgroup of unemployed womenwomen receiving disability benefit had an increased risk of preterm ruptured membranes (OR=3.1695% CI: 1.496.70)elective caesarean section (OR=2.9895% CI: 1.217.34)and preterm birth (OR=2.6495% CI: 1.325.28) as compared to housewives. Offspring of both students and women receiving disability benefit had a significantly lower mean birth weight than the offspring of housewives (difference: -9395% CI: -174-12; and -9795% CI: -190-5respectively). In the subgroup of employed womenlong working hours (i.e. ¡Ý40 h/week) were associated with a decrease of 54 g in offspring’s mean birth weight (adjusted analysis; 95% CI: -89-1) compared with 1 to 24 h/weekly working hours.

Conclusions: We found no indications that paid employment during pregnancy benefits or endangers the health of mother and child. Within the subgroups of unemployed and employed women we observedhoweverthat women receiving disability benefitstudents and women with long working hours during pregnancy were at risk for some adverse pregnancy outcomes. More research is needed to replicate these results and to provide explanations for these findings. Meanwhileprenatal care providers should be made aware of the risks associated with specific types of unemployment and long working hours.

Filed under: HealthPhysical loadpregnancy Tagged: Adverse effectspregnancyWork hours
Post a comment
Write a comment: