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Posted May 08 2010 12:00am

I live!  I apologize greatly for such a prolonged absence, but it was important for me to focus these months on school.  It has paid off because as of today I hold a Master of Arts degree in Bioethics and Medical Humanities.  Hurrah!  Now, I hope to devote the proper amount of time to this blog.  I began writing an article about the vulva before my hiatus and decided to finish it for my return.

So, what is the vulva? What’s the difference between the vulva and the vagina? Isn’t it all just one, connected thing down there? Why are there different names if it’s just a vagina, after all?  What does the vulva do?  All good questions. All questions I hope to answer.

The word vulva comes from Latin and was used to mean “womb” or, more generally, “female genitals.”  In modern usage, the word vulva refers specifically to the the external genitals of the female.  The word vagina is often used as a catchall term to refer to both the internal and external reproductive organs of a female; however, to be completely correct, the vagina is an internal structure only and the vulva is the external structure only.  These external components that make up what we call the vulva include the clitoris, the labia majora and minora (outer and inner lips), the pubic mound (mons pubis), the vestibule of the vagina (the area inside the labia minora that includes the openings for the urethra and vagina), and the vaginal orifice (the actual opening of the vagina).

Here is a diagram:

Its development occurs during phases, particularly the fetal and pubertal stages.  As the entrance to the reproductive tract, it protects its opening by a “double door”:  the labia majora (large lips) and the labia minora (small lips).  The vagina is a self-cleaning organ with an environment that promotes healthy microorganisms that balance each other out and guard against invading, unhealthy elements.   Cleaning your vulva is important to gynecological health.  Simply use warm water and mild soap on a daily basis.  (Remember, this is for external use!)  It is unwise to use heavily perfumed soaps as they can irritate your vulva.  It is also unnecessary to douche unless a doctor specifically recommends it.  Douches can cause irritation and flush out those healthy microorganisms allowing for infection to set in.  The vulva is more vulnerable to infections than the external genitalia of males.  So, take good care of it.

The vulva is key to sexual functioning.  The external structures of female genitalia are very full of nerve endings allowing for pleasure when properly stimulated.  When aroused, the vulva undergoes several physical changes it making it one of the external signs that a woman is aroused.  First, moisture from the vagina reaches the vaginal orifice, moistening the vulva.  The labia majora become enlarged and spread apart somewhat and can change color somewhat (darkened from increased blood flow).  The labia minora and the clitoris also increase in size.  During orgasm, the various muscles contract, though most of these contracting muscles are not located in the vulva.  Following orgasm, stimulation of the vulva may be uncomfortable or even painful.  The increased blood flow slowly dissipates until the vulva returns to normal.

The vulva performs different functions than the vagina, thus it is important to know the difference between the vulva and the vagina.  Especially if you are talking to a medical professional, be sure to clarify whether you mean the internal structures (vagina) or the external structures (vulva).  Have anything to say about vulvas?  Have you say and leave a comment!

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