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Fallopian Tubes

Posted Apr 09 2009 7:14pm 3 Comments

What springs to mind when Fallopian tubes are mentioned?  That they “connect” the ovaries to the uterus which leads finally to the vagina and the outside of the body?  Perhaps you think about ectopic pregnancies, as most ectopic pregnancies are indeed “tubal” pregnancies.  Whatever you may think of when Fallopian tubes are brought up, they are some of the least considered and understood parts of a woman’s reproductive tract.  Besides connecting the uterus and ovaries, do they do anything else?  Are they homologous to any part of the male anatomy?  Let’s try to answer some of the most common questions about Fallopian tubes.

First, where does the name “Fallopian” come from?  Unlike most parts of a woman’s reproductive system, this name does not come from Latin or Greek.  The Fallopian tubes are named for Gabriele Falloppio, a 16th-century Italian anatomist.  The canal through which the facial nerve runs after leaving the auditory cochlear nerve is also named after him–the aquaeductus Fallopii.

Back to the subject, why are the Fallopian tubes so often ignored?  Perhaps it has something to do with the lack of pathology or disease associated with the Fallopian tubes.  The most common maladies associated with the Fallopian tubes are, indeed, tubal (ectopic) pregnancy and pelvic inflammatory disease (PID).  (To read about two cases of rare ectopic pregnancies, click here.)  Ectopic  pregnancies are estimated to account for less than two of every one-hundred pregnancies.  PID is estimated to occur in nearly one in seven women in the United States.  PID accounts for a large number of all ectopic pregnancies, especially tubal.  Other disease are very rare in the Fallopian tubes.  Cancer, for example, is extremely rare and when it occurs it is often the result of adjacent cancer (such as ovarian).

So, what does a Fallopian tube look like?

The above sketch shows the different parts of the Fallopian tubes.  The fimbriae are the fringe-like extensions from the ostium of the Fallopian tube.   During ovulation, hormones stimulate the fimbriae to make a gentle sweeping motion against the ovaries to pull the released egg (or ovum) into the Fallopian tube.  The ovary and Fallopian are not actually connected to each other.  The ostium is where the fimbriae end and the Fallopian tube begins.  The infundibulum is the wider end of the Fallopian tube that narrows into the ampulla, which is the twisting portion of the tube in the above sketch.  It is where most fertilizations occur.  The ampulla continues into the isthmus, the shortest and most narrow portion of the Fallopian tube.  The pars uterina is the place where the uterus and Fallopian tube connects.

This sketch indicates better how the Fallopian tubes, uterus, and ovaries are all connected (or, in fact, not connected).  Most human Fallopian tubes are between seven and fourteen centimeters in length. Once an egg has entered the Fallopian tube, the mucosal cilia of the Fallopian tube move the egg towards the uterus.  The cilia are finger-like projects that sweep or push.  (Cilia are also found in the windpipe and sweep mucus and dust away from the lungs.)  Finally, Fallopian tubes are not homologous to any structure in the male body, thus they are completely unique to the female body.  (The ovaries, for example, are homologous to testes in males.)

Now, hopefully you and I both know a little more about the Fallopian tubes.  Want to know more or already know more and want to share it?  Please, don’t be shy!

Comments (3)
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MY NAME IS SARA I WOULD LIKE TO KNOW WHO TO TALK TO ON IMPLANTING ARTIFICIAL FALLOPIAN TUBE THANK YOU
That's a tough call.  I think, though I am not an expert on this, that the use of artificial Fallopian tubes is only seen within medical studies in the United States.  At the moment I am unaware of any studies of artificial Fallopian tubes, but that does not mean there is not one.  I know that in the past researchers at the University of Utah School of Medicine in Salt Lake City have done studies of artificial Fallopian tubes.  You might want to try to contact them (http://medicine.utah.edu/obgyn/).  Also, it is possible that in other countries there are doctors who have performed this procedure, though I am unsure of where would be the best bet.  It seems I may have heard of attempts to implant artificial Fallopian tubes in Italy, France, and/or Australia.  Another possible route might be to consider a Fallopian tube transplant (from a live or cadaveric donor).  It might be a bit easier to find a doctor who will consent to this method rather than an artificial Fallopian tube procedure.  Also, in vitro fertilization (IVF), assuming you are attempting to get pregnant, is a means to achieve pregnancy that requires no Fallopian tubes.  IVF is difficult, but very often worth the trouble.  I hope this answer helps!

A nice method to show your information.

thank you

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