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Preventing and Treating Swimmer’s Ear

Posted Aug 02 2014 11:00am

Swimmers ear

Summer is the best time for swimming and playing in the water. A refreshing swimming pool or a swim in the ocean, river or lake may be one of the best moments of every summer season but it can also lead to not-so-enjoyable moments.

Otitis externa, popular known as  swimmer’s ear , is an inflammation of the outer ear and ear canal. Along with otitis media, external otitis is one of the two human conditions commonly called earache. These earaches are the result of an inflammation of the skin of the ear canal, which sometimes can be secondary to dermatitis (eczema) only, with no microbial infection, or it can be caused by active bacterial or fungal infection. In either case, but more often with infection, the ear canal skin swells and may become painful or tender to touch.

Preventing and treating swimmer’s ear is easy and can be done in many different ways. Avoid inserting anything into the ear canal. For example, use of cotton buds or swabs is the most common event leading to acute otitis externa. Most normal ear canals have a self-cleaning and self-drying mechanism, the latter by simple evaporation.

Ear drops may be used and you may want to try homeopathic ear drops , which are often used for earaches.  Ear relief ear drops help clear water trapped in the ear and the homeopathic ingredients help stimulate the body’s natural ability to soothe the ear, decrease the ear’s sensitivity to external factors such as water, cold, and drafts, reduce the clogged sensation in the ear, and return the ear to a water-free and comfortable condition.

Earplugs are also helpful but make sure to get good quality products. Hard and poorly fitting ear plugs can scratch the ear canal skin. It’s highly recommended that you use disposable ear plugs to avoid contaminating the ear canal.

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