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Vincent Racaniello

At virology blog, my goal is to educate you about viruses - the kind that make you sick. Why am I qualified to teach you virology? I have been studying viruses for over 30 years, starting in 1975, when I entered the Ph.D. program in Biomedical Sciences at Mt. Sinai School of Medicine of the City... Full Bio
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TWiV 332: Vanderbilt virology by Vincent Racaniello Posted in: Blog Posts in General Medicine On episode #332 of the science show This Week in Virology, Vincent visits Vanderbilt University and meets up with Seth, Jim, and Mark to talk about their work on a virus ... Read on »
A transmissible cancer of soft-shell clams by Vincent Racaniello Posted in: Blog Posts in General Medicine A leukemia-like cancer is killing soft-shell clams along the east coast of North America. The cancer is transmitted between animals in the ocean, and appears to have o ... Read on »
TWiV 331: Why is this outbreak different from all other outbreaks? by Vincent Racaniello Posted in: Blog Posts in General Medicine On episode #331 of the science show This Week in Virology, the TWiV team discusses the possible association of the respiratory pathogen enterovirus D68 with neurological ... Read on »
HeLa RNA is everywhere by Vincent Racaniello Posted in: Blog Posts in General Medicine The first immortal human cell line ever produced, HeLa, originated from a cervical adenocarcinoma taken from Henrietta Lacks . The cell line grew so well that it was us ... Read on »
TWiV 330: A swinging gate by Vincent Racaniello Posted in: Blog Posts in General Medicine On episode #330 of the science show This Week in Virology, the TWiVers explain how a protein platform assists the hepatitis C virus RNA polymerase to begin the task of ma ... Read on »
A protein platform for priming by Vincent Racaniello Posted in: Blog Posts in General Medicine The enzymes that make copies of the DNA or RNA genomes of viruses – nucleic acid polymerases – can be placed into two broad categories depending on whether or not they re ... Read on »
TWiV 329: Pox in the balance by Vincent Racaniello Posted in: Blog Posts in General Medicine On episode #329 of the science show This Week in Virology, the TWiV team reviews identification of immune biomarkers in CFS/ME patients, and how a cell nuclease controls ... Read on »
Covering up a naked virus by Vincent Racaniello Posted in: Blog Posts in General Medicine Viruses can be broadly classified according to whether or not the particle is enveloped – surrounded by a membrane taken from the host cell – or naked. Some naked virus ... Read on »
TWiV 328: Lariat tricks in 3D by Vincent Racaniello Posted in: Blog Posts in General Medicine On episode #328 of the science show This Week in Virology, the TWiVocateurs discuss how the RNA polymerase of enteroviruses binds a component of the splicing machinery an ... Read on »
Is chronic wasting disease a threat to humans? by Vincent Racaniello Posted in: Blog Posts in General Medicine Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a prion disease of cervids (deer, elk, moose). It was first detected in Wyoming and Colorado, and has since spread rapidly throughout N ... Read on »
TWiV 327: Does a gorilla shift in the woods? by Vincent Racaniello Posted in: Blog Posts in General Medicine On episode #327 of the science show This Week in Virology, the eTWiVicators review evidence that the HIV-1 group O epidemic began with a single cross-species transmission ... Read on »
Blocking virus infection with soluble cell receptors by Vincent Racaniello Posted in: Blog Posts in General Medicine We recently discussed the development of a soluble receptor for HIV-1 that provides broad and effective protection against infection of cells and of nonhuman primates. ... Read on »
TWiV 326: Giving HIV a flat tyr by Vincent Racaniello Posted in: Blog Posts in General Medicine On episode #326 of the science show This Week in Virology, the sternutating TWiVers discuss preventing infection of cells and animals by a soluble CD4-CCR5 molecule that ... Read on »
Blocking HIV infection with two soluble receptors by Vincent Racaniello Posted in: Blog Posts in General Medicine Infection with HIV-1 requires two cell surface molecules, CD4 and a chemokine receptor (either CCR5 or CXCR4), which are engaged by the viral glycoprotein gp120 (illustr ... Read on »
TWiV 325: Wildcats go viral by Vincent Racaniello Posted in: Blog Posts in General Medicine On episode #325 of the science show This Week in Virology, Vincent visits the ‘Little Apple’ and speaks with Rollie and Lorena about their work on mosquito-born viruses a ... Read on »
Ebolavirus will not become a respiratory pathogen by Vincent Racaniello Posted in: Blog Posts in General Medicine An otherwise balanced review of selected aspects of Ebolavirus transmission falls apart when the authors hypothesize that ‘Ebola viruses have the potential to be respirat ... Read on »
Measles in the brain: Fusion gone awry by Vincent Racaniello Posted in: Blog Posts in General Medicine Measles virus particles bind to cell surface receptors via the viral glycoprotein HN (illustrated). Once the viral and cell membranes have been brought together by this ... Read on »
TWiV 324: Viruses in the miR may appear more numerous by Vincent Racaniello Posted in: Blog Posts in General Medicine On episode #324 of the science show This Week in Virology, Lee joins the TWiV team to discuss the value of post-doctoral training, and how a cellular microRNA assists in ... Read on »
What does transfection mean? by Vincent Racaniello Posted in: Blog Posts in General Medicine I have always had a problem with the use of the word transfection to mean anything other than the introduction of viral DNA into cells (illustrated for poliovirus). An ex ... Read on »
Viral supercomputer simulations by Vincent Racaniello Posted in: Blog Posts in General Medicine Jason Roberts, a virologist at the Victorian Infectious Disease Reference Laboratory in Melbourne, Australia, creates three-dimensional simulations of viruses showing how ... Read on »