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Vincent Racaniello

At virology blog, my goal is to educate you about viruses - the kind that make you sick. Why am I qualified to teach you virology? I have been studying viruses for over 30 years, starting in 1975, when I entered the Ph.D. program in Biomedical Sciences at Mt. Sinai School of Medicine of the City... Full Bio
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Is chronic wasting disease a threat to humans? by Vincent Racaniello Posted in: Blog Posts in General Medicine Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a prion disease of cervids (deer, elk, moose). It was first detected in Wyoming and Colorado, and has since spread rapidly throughout N ... Read on »
TWiV 327: Does a gorilla shift in the woods? by Vincent Racaniello Posted in: Blog Posts in General Medicine On episode #327 of the science show This Week in Virology, the eTWiVicators review evidence that the HIV-1 group O epidemic began with a single cross-species transmission ... Read on »
Blocking virus infection with soluble cell receptors by Vincent Racaniello Posted in: Blog Posts in General Medicine We recently discussed the development of a soluble receptor for HIV-1 that provides broad and effective protection against infection of cells and of nonhuman primates. ... Read on »
TWiV 326: Giving HIV a flat tyr by Vincent Racaniello Posted in: Blog Posts in General Medicine On episode #326 of the science show This Week in Virology, the sternutating TWiVers discuss preventing infection of cells and animals by a soluble CD4-CCR5 molecule that ... Read on »
Blocking HIV infection with two soluble receptors by Vincent Racaniello Posted in: Blog Posts in General Medicine Infection with HIV-1 requires two cell surface molecules, CD4 and a chemokine receptor (either CCR5 or CXCR4), which are engaged by the viral glycoprotein gp120 (illustr ... Read on »
TWiV 325: Wildcats go viral by Vincent Racaniello Posted in: Blog Posts in General Medicine On episode #325 of the science show This Week in Virology, Vincent visits the ‘Little Apple’ and speaks with Rollie and Lorena about their work on mosquito-born viruses a ... Read on »
Ebolavirus will not become a respiratory pathogen by Vincent Racaniello Posted in: Blog Posts in General Medicine An otherwise balanced review of selected aspects of Ebolavirus transmission falls apart when the authors hypothesize that ‘Ebola viruses have the potential to be respirat ... Read on »
Measles in the brain: Fusion gone awry by Vincent Racaniello Posted in: Blog Posts in General Medicine Measles virus particles bind to cell surface receptors via the viral glycoprotein HN (illustrated). Once the viral and cell membranes have been brought together by this ... Read on »
TWiV 324: Viruses in the miR may appear more numerous by Vincent Racaniello Posted in: Blog Posts in General Medicine On episode #324 of the science show This Week in Virology, Lee joins the TWiV team to discuss the value of post-doctoral training, and how a cellular microRNA assists in ... Read on »
What does transfection mean? by Vincent Racaniello Posted in: Blog Posts in General Medicine I have always had a problem with the use of the word transfection to mean anything other than the introduction of viral DNA into cells (illustrated for poliovirus). An ex ... Read on »
Viral supercomputer simulations by Vincent Racaniello Posted in: Blog Posts in General Medicine Jason Roberts, a virologist at the Victorian Infectious Disease Reference Laboratory in Melbourne, Australia, creates three-dimensional simulations of viruses showing how ... Read on »
TWiV 323: A skid loader full of viromes by Vincent Racaniello Posted in: Blog Posts in General Medicine On episode #323 of the science show This Week in Virology, the family TWiVidae discuss changes in the human fecal virome associated with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative co ... Read on »
Detecting prions by quaking and shaking by Vincent Racaniello Posted in: Blog Posts in General Medicine These assays utilize two different methods for amplifying the quantity of prions in vitro. In real-time quaking-induced conversion, PrPC (produced in E. coli) is mixed w ... Read on »
TWiV 322: Postcards from the edge of the membrane by Vincent Racaniello Posted in: Blog Posts in General Medicine On episode #322 of the science show This Week in Virology, the TWiVodes answer listener email about hantaviruses, antivirals, H1N1 vaccine and narcolepsy, credibility of ... Read on »
Infectious agents with no genome by Vincent Racaniello Posted in: Blog Posts in General Medicine If the reader does not believe that viroids and satellites are distinctive, then surely prions, infectious agents composed only of protein, must impress. The question ... Read on »
TWiV 321: aTRIP and a pause by Vincent Racaniello Posted in: Blog Posts in General Medicine On episode #321 of the science show This Week in Virology, Paul Duprex joins the TWiV team to discuss the current moratorium on viral research to alter transmission, rang ... Read on »
Satellites – the viral kind by Vincent Racaniello Posted in: Blog Posts in General Medicine Satellites are subviral agents that differ from viroids because they depend on the presence of a helper virus for their propagation. Satellite viruses are particles tha ... Read on »
TWiV 320: Retroviruses and cranberries by Vincent Racaniello Posted in: Blog Posts in General Medicine On episode #320 of the science show This Week in Virology, Vincent speaks with John Coffin about his career studying retroviruses, including working with Howard Temin, en ... Read on »
Viroids, infectious agents that encode no proteins by Vincent Racaniello Posted in: Blog Posts in General Medicine Genomes of non-defective viruses range in size from 2,400,000 bp of dsDNA (Pandoravirus salinus) to 1,759 bp of ssDNA (porcine circovirus). Are even smaller viral genom ... Read on »
TWiV 319: Breaking breakbone by Vincent Racaniello Posted in: Blog Posts in General Medicine On episode #319 of the science show This Week in Virology, the TWiVers review the outcomes of two recent phase 3 clinical trials of a quadrivalent dengue virus vaccine in ... Read on »