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So Thankful for Stuffing

Posted Jun 11 2009 8:11pm
I am truly thankful that I have a family who is open-minded. Although I grew up eating meat, I also was taught to care for animals. My compassion towards lost and injured animals was honored by my parents who helped me, help animals. When I went vegan, and my little sister followed quickly behind, my parents were receptive to the possibility of having no meat on the table at Thanksgiving to respect our beliefs. My family had the extra bonus that I made the entire meal. It was a wonderful win-win situation since I love to cook and I knew everything on the table was something I could eat. My parents and sister got to enjoy tasty food and relax for the day. This has been my family tradition for many years now. Although I take a year off now and then to spend time with friends instead of family, this new tradition is always open to me.


Traditional Stuffing

3 1/2 cups Bread Crumbs
1 cup Vegetable Broth
1/4 cup Margarine (Non-hydrogenized)
6 celery stalks, chopped
1 small onion, chopped
2 tsp Sage, rubbed
1 tsp Marjoram
1/2 tsp Salt
1/2 tsp Black Pepper

Melt the margarine over medium high heat in a skillet and add the onion and celery. Sauté for about 5 minutes or until the vegetables are soft. In a medium sized pan, heat the vegetable broth until boiling. In a large bowl, combine the bread crumbs, herbs, salt and cooked celery and onion. Stir all of this to combine thoroughly. Slowly add the vegetable broth, stirring occasionally to cover all the bread crumbs. Use as directed in the Thanksgiving Gluten Roast or place stuffing in a greased 9-inch square pan bake at 375°F for about 30 minutes.
*To make your own bread crumbs, cut a loaf of bread in cubes. Place on a large cookie sheet and bake at 300°F for about 20-30 minutes, using a spatula about every 5 minutes to move around the bread so it will dry out evenly.
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