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The Essential Triathlon Gear You're Probably Forgetting

Posted Aug 27 2010 6:35pm
Most triathletes spend the majority of time during the days and weeks prior
to a race planning their triathlon gear for the race itself - shoes, helmet,
bike, wetsuit, goggles and all the crucial elements to finish a triathlon.
But the majority of these same triathletes neglect to consider post-race
triathlon gear needs.

But if you show up in the race transition area with a backpack full of the
essential triathlon gear you're going to need after the race, you'll be
prepared for a much more comfortable and successful race and recovery. So
without further ado, here's the essential triathlon gear you're probably
forgetting, straight from http://www.rockstartriathleteacademy.com.

Protein: If you can consume a combination of protein and carbohydrates
within 20-30 minutes after crossing the finish line, your muscles will have
the amino acids they need to repair the muscle fibers that become damaged
during a triathlon. Unfortunately, most triathlon finish lines offer
bananas, oranges, energy bars, pizza, or other foods that are notoriously
low in protein. Pack your own protein, and you'll be set for far faster
recovery, which is especially important if you want to get back to training
or racing soon after your event. I personally put a bottle of something
called "Recoverease" ( http://www.pacificfit.netsupplements.php#recoverease ) in my backpack, which contains essential amino acids and enzymes that assistin protein digestion.

Electrolytes: Sure, to avoid cramping you may already use salt capsules or a
sport drink with electrolytes during the race - but after a race, you
continue to sweat and lose valuable salts and minerals. In addition, one
primary cause of muscle soreness is calcium leakage within muscle tissue. So
after each race, I spray my arms and legs with a topical magnesium
( http://www.magneticclay.com/120-MagnesiumOil-72-custom.html ) - which can displace the calcium and also replace a notoriously deficient mineral. Since I added topical magnesium to my post-race triathlon gear, I've specifically noticed a much faster heart rate recovery, and less "dead leg" phenomenon after an event.

Wipes: Have you ever finished a triathlon and realized that although you're
going to need to stick around for a few hours to chat with friends and
attend the award ceremony, you stink to high heaven? Often, jumping back
into the swim venue just doesn't seem to wash that stink away, and most
triathlon finish line areas don't have locker rooms equipped with showers.
Combined with sweat, bike oil, blood, gravel, sand, dirt and all the other
compounds that collect on your body during race, it can be downright
unpleasant standing around in your post-race filth. But by putting some baby
wipes, or better yet, some environmentally friendly, athlete-designed
Actionwipes
( http://store.yahoo.com/cgi-bin/clink?yhst-14088633867012+5xgHpa+http://www.
actionwipes.com
) into your post-race triathlon gear bag, you'll smell like a
spa, feel clean, and look great - especially if you have to hop up on the
podium.

Clothes: When it comes to post-race triathlon gear, it seems as though
clothes would be a no-brainer. But whether clothes are easily forgotten
while packing a bike, wetsuit and other crucial items, or folks just don't
remember that there are many post-race hours spent standing around and
socializing, clothing just doesn't seem to make it into many post-race gear
bags. If you peak in my post-race backpack, I always have a) a comfortable,
breathable t-shirt or tanktop; b) loose-fitting cargo shorts that won't
chafe against sore areas; c) underwear that will wick away sweat and also
not chafe against sore areas (i.e. Slix at
http://www.bengreenfieldfitness.com/2010/08/ben-greenfields-top-five-criteri
a-for-healthy-mens-underwear/)
; d) flip-flops, sandals, or anything else
that in no way resembles a running shoes.

By either leaving a backpack full of this essential post-race triathlon gear
in transition area, or having a spouse, family member or friend give it to
you after the race, you'll be set for a faster recovery. Beware that some
races do not allow "loose" transition areas with backpacks strewn about, so
be prepared for the latter option. For more triathlon gear tips just like
this, along with audio interviews with coaches and triathlon experts, check
out http://www.rockstartriathleteacademy.com.

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