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Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy

Copenhagen, Denmark
Thomas Zoëga Ramsøy (b. 1973 in Oslo, Norway) is a cognitive neuroscientist, trained in clinical and scientific neuropsychology. His work at Copenhagen Business School and Danish Research Centre for Magnetic Resonance in Copenhagen, Denmark focuses on a range of different aspects... Full Bio
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Every year renowned literary age... by Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy Posted in: Blog Posts in Bioethics Every year renowned literary agent John Brockman asks a group of prominent scientists a question and posts their answers at his web-site The Edge. This years question i ... Read on »
How are economic decisions made?... by Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy Posted in: Blog Posts in Bioethics How are economic decisions made? How and why are we social? According to the traditional economic , humans are rational and self-regarding beings. Not so, says recent a ... Read on »
In the growing field of cosmetic... by Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy Posted in: Blog Posts in Bioethics In the growing field of cosmetic neurology, an approach that seeks to enhance the brain’s workings, one branch seeks to develop new drugs that not only help those suffe ... Read on »
While we’re at it with cosmetic ... by Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy Posted in: Blog Posts in Bioethics While we’re at it with cosmetic neurology, there is also a nice article by Chatterjee freely available in Neurology. I think the conclusion in this paper says it all: ... Read on »
The problem with arm-chair hypot... by Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy Posted in: Blog Posts in Bioethics The problem with arm-chair hypotheses such as the Sapir-Whorf idea that the language you speak determines how you think, is that they are all-or-nothing contentions. Ei ... Read on »
The most recent issue of Nature ... by Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy Posted in: Blog Posts in Bioethics The most recent issue of Nature Neuroscience contains a truly amazing study by the Thomas Insel-group. Insel and his colleagues have for many years studied pair-formati ... Read on »
Until recently anatomists were c... by Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy Posted in: Blog Posts in Bioethics Until recently anatomists were convinced that humans are born with all the neurons they are ever going to own. In the first years of life, some of theses neurons are th ... Read on »
This book from Cambridge Univers... by Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy Posted in: Blog Posts in Bioethics This book from Cambridge University Press looks interesting. I haven’t actually read it yet, but the new issue of Nature has a rather positive review of it. A brief pas ... Read on »
On a hot summer day 15 years ago... by Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy Posted in: Blog Posts in Bioethics On a hot summer day 15 years ago in Parma, Italy, a monkey sat in a special laboratory chair waiting for researchers to return from lunch. Thin wires had been implanted ... Read on »
This year it is 150 years ago th... by Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy Posted in: Blog Posts in Bioethics This year it is 150 years ago that miners in the German Neander Valley lucked upon 16 fossils that turned out to belong to a different homo species. The Neanderthals ar ... Read on »
While trying to digest the overw... by Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy Posted in: Blog Posts in Bioethics While trying to digest the overwhelming yet so short conference on Imaging Genetics in Irvine, I find myself just tapping into some of the latest headlines. This little ... Read on »
There is a most interesting ques... by Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy Posted in: Blog Posts in Bioethics There is a most interesting question being posed at the ABC The Science Show: “What are the implications of the latest advances in neural prosthetics?” THE SCIENC ... Read on »
An online published paper by Joh... by Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy Posted in: Blog Posts in Bioethics An online published paper by John Hyman provides a thorough criticism of two major contributors to the emergent field of neuroaesthetics, V.S. Ramachandran and Semir Ze ... Read on »
Today’s NY Times Magazine has a ... by Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy Posted in: Blog Posts in Bioethics Today’s NY Times Magazine has a rather fascinating story about research on animal personality. Although eradicated by behaviourism, the notion that others animals than ... Read on »
Yesterday I mentioned that brain... by Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy Posted in: Blog Posts in Bioethics Yesterday I mentioned that brain scientists are actively investigating the neural processes underlying personality differences in behaviour. A very nice example of this ... Read on »
One of the important basic discu... by Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy Posted in: Blog Posts in Bioethics One of the important basic discussions in congitive neuroscience is that of the fusiform face area (FFA). The FFA has been suggested as a part of the fusiform gyrus tha ... Read on »
Apparently the Dalai Lama is a s... by Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy Posted in: Blog Posts in Bioethics Apparently the Dalai Lama is a science buff. For some years now he has lend out munks to Richard Davidson, an expert on emotion, who is currently studying what happens ... Read on »
Throughout 2005 126 EU citizens ... by Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy Posted in: Blog Posts in Bioethics Throughout 2005 126 EU citizens participated in something called the “Meeting of Minds”, learning about neuroscience and debating what to do with our ever increasing kn ... Read on »
If you downloaded the radio prog... by Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy Posted in: Blog Posts in Bioethics If you downloaded the radio programme on neuroprosthetics that Thomas mentions in a post below, you’ll want to also hear the January 13 version of BBC’s excellent radio ... Read on »
The insights from brain science ... by Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy Posted in: Blog Posts in Bioethics The insights from brain science has the potential to alter the making and practice of law. But how and why? What is so special about brain science that gives it this po ... Read on »