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Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy

Copenhagen, Denmark
Thomas Zoëga Ramsøy (b. 1973 in Oslo, Norway) is a cognitive neuroscientist, trained in clinical and scientific neuropsychology. His work at Copenhagen Business School and Danish Research Centre for Magnetic Resonance in Copenhagen, Denmark focuses on a range of different aspects... Full Bio
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The Center for Integrated Molecu... by Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy Posted in: Blog Posts in Bioethics The Center for Integrated Molecular Brain Imaging (CIMBI) is now officially opened. The overall idea behind this massive project is to study cognitive, psycholog ... Read on »
As I mentioned in this post , th... by Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy Posted in: Blog Posts in Bioethics As I mentioned in this post, the videos from this year’s International Imaging Genetics Conference would be just around the corner. Turns out that was a precise predict ... Read on »
I have written a small piece abo... by Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy Posted in: Blog Posts in Bioethics I have written a small piece about imaging genetics (IG) in Science & Consciousness Review. IG is IMHO really going to revolutionize cognitive science, hopefully ... Read on »
In a NeuroImage article this Feb... by Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy Posted in: Blog Posts in Bioethics In a NeuroImage article this February, Krishnan et al. demonstrate how poor spatial normalization can be for the hippocampus. Spatial normalization is an image p ... Read on »
This is a new conference on comb... by Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy Posted in: Blog Posts in Bioethics This is a new conference on combining the knowledge from genetics, neuroimaging and behavioural science. A brief look at the program is enough: I’m going! 7th ... Read on »
If you have read Thomas’ fine in... by Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy Posted in: Blog Posts in Bioethics If you have read Thomas’ fine introduction to Ahmad Hariri’s work on the link between gene expression, serotonin re-uptake and emotion, you may be interested in hearing ... Read on »
As discussed before here on the ... by Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy Posted in: Blog Posts in Bioethics As discussed before here on the blog, imaging studies by Josh Greene, Jorge Moll and others have demonstrated that emotional responses play a pivotal role in forming mo ... Read on »
I thought it would be a good thi... by Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy Posted in: Blog Posts in Bioethics I thought it would be a good thing as a host to welcome you to this new blog. We discovered it while travelling through the blogosphere. So why take the chance and chan ... Read on »
Click on the image to see full s... by Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy Posted in: Blog Posts in Bioethics Click on the image to see full size What happens in the brain when we become conscious of something? What processes and structures are responsible for becomin ... Read on »
Neuroscience affects the way we ... by Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy Posted in: Blog Posts in Bioethics Neuroscience affects the way we think about ourselves. It affects how we think of normal and abnormal minds. It has influence on how people are judged according to l ... Read on »
Synaesthesia is a rare condition... by Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy Posted in: Blog Posts in Bioethics Synaesthesia is a rare condition where people experience some percepts as a different sensory modality than the one they normally belong to - e.g., numbers as colours, ... Read on »
From time to time I receive emai... by Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy Posted in: Blog Posts in Bioethics From time to time I receive emails from people who have relatives or other loved ones that suffer from a neurological or psychiatric condition. I respond to these the b ... Read on »
You probably knew this already, ... by Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy Posted in: Blog Posts in Bioethics You probably knew this already, but now it has been proved: Musicians are different from you and me. Mounting evidence suggests that playing an instrument will literall ... Read on »
Below I discuss the continuity o... by Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy Posted in: Blog Posts in Bioethics Below I discuss the continuity of the human and chimp brains. I also briefly mentioned the much exiting research being done these years on chimp behaviour. One of the p ... Read on »
For many years researchers in co... by Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy Posted in: Blog Posts in Bioethics For many years researchers in cognitive neurscience have known that episodic memory does not work like a tape recorder or a computer hard drive. Recollection of event ... Read on »
Show my your amygdala size and I... by Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy Posted in: Blog Posts in Bioethics Show my your amygdala size and I’ll tell you who you are! In a study by Omura, Constable & Canli in the November 2005 issue of NeuroReport (see abstract + links below), ... Read on »
Neuroethics is slowly beginning ... by Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy Posted in: Blog Posts in Bioethics Neuroethics is slowly beginning to get some attention from the non-academic press. One of the persons responsible for this emerging interest is Martha Farah who has wri ... Read on »
The journal Science has an issue... by Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy Posted in: Blog Posts in Bioethics The journal Science has an issue dedicated to brain development and brain plasticity. Models of the brain have changed from viewing plasticity as something occurring on ... Read on »
A special issue of Anatomy and E... by Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy Posted in: Blog Posts in Bioethics A special issue of Anatomy and Embryology is out, dedicated to the issue of brain structure vs. function. It has several interesting articles, such as the developmental ... Read on »
There is no doubt that there are... by Thomas Z. Ramsøy Doctor of Philosophy Posted in: Blog Posts in Bioethics There is no doubt that there are hemispheric differences in the brain. We know that in most people, the left hemisphere is dominant for language production. Damage to t ... Read on »