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6 sources of bodybuilding myths ...

Posted Sep 13 2008 5:22pm

6 sources of bodybuilding myths

  1. Websites and Magazine Editors:

    Without a doubt, magazines and websites can be a popular source of bodybuilding myths. Sometimes the story will just have it’s facts wrong. Or it might be an editorial. More often than not, editors have to take an old story and put some popular spin on it to make it more interesting.

    Pick up an issue of Cosmo, Us, People or look at back issues of most popular fitness magazines. How many times have you seen a new twist or angle put on the ever popular, “Arnold’s Arm Routine.”

    It’s part of life to re-create, re-package and enhance old stories. Just keep in mind that myths can start anywhere.

  2. The “I Feel It” Syndrome:

    Just because it worked for me, doesn’t mean it works for you. This can apply to training programs or supplements. The “I Feel It Syndrome” simply doesn’t take into account the Principle of Individual Differences. Everybody is slightly different. If a beginning builder happens to respond very well to some strange exercise (not taking into account they are new and will almost respond to anything) doesn’t make that exercise or routine one that will work for everybody.

  3. The “Big Guy” Syndrome:

    A younger bodybuilder might look up to the biggest guy in the gym, but without knowing how the big guy got big… it can be a real source of myths. How he or she got big might be 1) hard work and dedication 2) genetics 3) drugs 4) combination of all the suggested. The person asking simply doesn’t really know how they got bigger and most likely it will be a combination of hard work and dedication along with some psuedo-scientific explanation of their training.

  4. Supplements Salespeople:

    How many supplements have over 300 peer reviewed and published studies behind them from various sources? Not many. Supplement salespeople have a clear agenda to push their products. Which is fine expect you don’t know what they are thinking, their agenda or if they have some quota to fill. Just keep in mind they may or may not know what they are talking about. Keeping yourself informed will help you make the right choices and help them direct you to what you want.

  5. Equipmenet Salespeople:

    Similar to the supplement salespeople, how many highly training equipment sales people are fully aware of biomechanics and how exercises related to the body? Not a whole lot. You could get an entirely different story about muscle building from a Bowflex salesperson over a person at Sears who wants to sell you a weight stacked machine. You can easily fall prey to the machines vs. free weights myths right here.

  6. Podcasters:

    Heck, I’ll put myself on the chopping block here. With the Internet being so popular and everybody having a microphone, all of us who podcast about fitness can spread myths or be a new source of a myth. Much like website or magazine editors, we want readers and listeners and might put new slants on old stories. Hopefully you will research things for yourself, get other opinions, check with your doctor if necessary and edcuate yourself so that you can make informed choices. Even my podcast is simply there to help you learn to love to learn.


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