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Detox or not to detox… that is the question

Posted Jun 12 2009 6:42pm

Monday 5th January 2009

With the start of a brand new year and after pigging out on chocolates, nuts, sweets and roast dinners for the last four weeks, no doubt many of you have made the New Year’s Resolutions of ‘eating properly’ and ‘exercise more’ (I know i have, amongst others!). However if you’re about to do your weekly shop and intend on only buying ’superfoods’ and ‘detox products’, you might want to think again.

Now, eating five portions of fruit and veg and drinking eight glasses of water a day will definitely have its benefits, however scientists have recently proven that some specially formulated ‘detox’ products bear false claims as to their miracle effects.

We have visited this time and again, most recently in the SkinGenesis newsletter. Some manufacturers create names that have a creative, yet medical-sounding name in order to encapsulate its market and make people think they’re using a much more powerful product than they really are.

Read the BBC’s take on it here. It reports on Garnier’s facewash and its claims that it rids the skin of toxins – toxins being dirt, skin oils, make-up etc, all of which can be removed with any decent facewash. Describing itself as eradicating toxins makes it sound more scientific, as though it is providing something out of the ordinary!

This is misleading and the Advertising Standards Authority has agreed to clamp down on any manufacturers products that receive complaints from consumers. And so they should!

Monday 5th January 2009

With the start of a brand new year and after pigging out on chocolates, nuts, sweets and roast dinners for the last four weeks, no doubt many of you have made the New Year’s Resolutions of ‘eating properly’ and ‘exercise more’ (I know i have, amongst others!). However if you’re about to do your weekly shop and intend on only buying ’superfoods’ and ‘detox products’, you might want to think again.

Now, eating five portions of fruit and veg and drinking eight glasses of water a day will definitely have its benefits, however scientists have recently proven that some specially formulated ‘detox’ products bear false claims as to their miracle effects.

We have visited this time and again, most recently in the SkinGenesis newsletter. Some manufacturers create names that have a creative, yet medical-sounding name in order to encapsulate its market and make people think they’re using a much more powerful product than they really are.

Read the BBC’s take on it here. It reports on Garnier’s facewash and its claims that it rids the skin of toxins – toxins being dirt, skin oils, make-up etc, all of which can be removed with any decent facewash. Describing itself as eradicating toxins makes it sound more scientific, as though it is providing something out of the ordinary!

This is misleading and the Advertising Standards Authority has agreed to clamp down on any manufacturers products that receive complaints from consumers. And so they should!

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