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There are many things I can do well on my own.

Posted Feb 18 2010 12:00am

Training for a marathon is not one of them. The first few times I brought up the possibility of running a marathon to my nutritionist, he would calmly point out the fact that people have died running marathons. I thought that was amusing, though very true. I’m glad it’s something he takes seriously. If anyone can be deterred from running a marathon, they should be. If they can’t be deterred, they should secure a professional team.

My nutritionist is half of my team. Before I met him I thought I knew what good nutrition was. You know, the basics: get your food groups in, fruits and veggies: good, chips and ice cream: bad. The day after I met him I realized I didn’t know anything. And sport nutrition is something else. Truly a science.

The way I’m eating now breaks most of the nutrition rules I always thought to be true. I don’t eat three times a day. I get hungry every 2-3 hours, and I eat. I literally have to carry food around with me because my body will constantly ask to be fed. You’d think I’d be obese at this rate, but instead I’m toning up fast and running quicker.

Ashley is the other half. The half that trains me. Ashley has some running background, but I never do cardio with her. Ashley has developed a multi phase program for me. The first consists of muscle building. Right now I’m strength training three times a week and running three times a week on my own.

As Race Day approaches, my runs will get longer and more frequent. At the same time I will enter a plyometrics and then an endurance phase with Ashley. Once I have the muscle mass to perform (not bulk, but lean and efficient muscle – think soccer player, not body builder), the plyometrics will teach me to move faster. Quick and nimble. Then the endurance phase will have me moving quickly for a long time.

With Ashley I also work on strengthening the muscles that will contribute most towards injury prevention. Preserving my knees and protecting my ankles and calves (the most common running injuries affect these areas). In future I will be blogging in more detail about my nutrition, strength training, and runs, but this a quick summary to start.

I will be writing a post soon about winter running. Yes, I run outdoors in the winter. I’m probably the only Latina who does. Truth be told, I’d rather run through hail than get on an oppressive, claustrophobic-inducing treadmill. And yes, I have actually run through hail (It caught me on a long trail run and I had no shelter. Great way to motivate a sprint, though I can’t say I recommend it). Stories to come!

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