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The Dog Days of Summer: How to Survive the Summer Running Season (Tips for Warm Weather Running)

Posted Aug 16 2013 8:13am

When you are a runner in Texas like I am, you learn to accept a certain truth: It is hot, Y'all.

These are the dog days of summer. What does that mean for your training? If you are an outdoor runner like me, you know that taking up the dreadmill is an option, but only as a last resort. So how do you keep training in the great outdoors and survive these summer month runs? Here are a few tips for the running in the heat that seem to work for me.

Drink water before, during, and after your run. Hydration isn't about chugging a ton of water before you head out the door, it is about staying hydrated. Drink water all day to try to stay in a hydrated state.

During my run, I often leave a couple bottles of water (try freezing them!) on my front stoop and run in loops, passing my house for a water stop as needed.

Caffeine and alcohol are diuretics so it is probably not a good idea to drink a bottle of wine at night then a Starbucks in the morning before your run. Try to avoid diuretics leading up to those hot runs. Use an electrolyte drink to replenish as needed during and after your run (especially any run longer than 30 minutes). I personally like Nuun . I won't give it four stars on taste, but it gets the job done.


Try to plan your running route along water fountains in local parks or schools or the neighbor's sprinkler system. Map out a run that is mostly in the shade, it can feel considerably cooler under tree cover. I like to run along the trails at my local park.

Try to avoid running during the hottest times of the day. Plan for early morning runs before the sun comes up ( It's hard, I know ) or evening runs after it cools off a bit.

Expect your pace to slow down in the heat. Don't push yourself to exhaustion, and take walk breaks as necessary. You can work on your speed indoors or once the weather cools off. Right now it is about getting it done safely.

I suggest wearing light-colored, light-weight, loose fitting, technical (i.e. not cotton) clothing . Avoid cotton clothing and socks altogether. Use a chafing cream to help prevent that awful burn that is inevitable when sweaty skin rubs together .

Don't forget the sunscreen! Even on overcast days you can burn and cause skin damage. Besides, no one likes a runners tan.

If you feel dizzy, nauseated, or if you get the chills, stop running immediately and head indoors to cool off and rehydrate, as these are signs of heat exhaustion. 

Although we might call them the dog days of summer , these days I leave Ollie at home during my runs. While I can hydrate and take it slow, it is just too hot for him. I look forward to the cool breeze of autumn so Ollie and I can rekindle our running friendship.

As always, use common sense and consult your doctor about any questions you might have about running safely in the heat. And most importantly, if you drop dead from heat exhaustion, don't blame me. :) 

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Keep Running,

Lea

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