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Climbing and Outdoor News from Here and Abroad - 1/31/13

Posted Jan 31 2013 9:00am
Northwest:

--The Winter Outdoor Retailer show took place last week and the indominable Fred Beckey won the Addidas Lifetime Achievement Award. Prolific outdoor writer, John Long wrote the script for the following short film which introduced Fred at the event
  

Sierra:

--It appears that a toilet will be installed in the Buttermilks, somewhere. Where, is currently up for debate. To learn more about this, click here .

--The Scientific American asks, what caused last year's hauntavirus outbreak in Yosemite National Park. To read the article, click here .

--To increase the reward fund designed to help capture the thieves and vandals who stole and defaced ancient petroglyphs near Bishop, the Bishop Paiute Tribe has launched a fundraising raffle. The Eastern Sierra Interpretive Association had set up a fund for a reward and for purchase of surveillance cameras and training of site stewards. At last count, the fund had grown to just under $10,000 – most for a reward. Debbie Eilts of the Association said donors have been “very passionate about finding who did this.” To read more, click here .

Desert Southwest:

-- Utah , a state often criticized for ignoring the benefits of recreating on and protecting its stunning landscapes, set a unique national precedent Wednesday by officially releasing "The State of Utah Outdoor Recreation Vision."The plan, among other things, calls for creating an Office of Outdoor Recreation to implement the vision and naming a director of outdoor recreation. To read more, click here .

A climber belaying in Joshua Tree National Park

--Several previously unknown species of trapdoor spiders were recently discovered and were named after several celebrities. Researchers made sure that they named one found at Joshua Tree National Park after U2 and their lead singer Bono, especially since the group named one of their most popular albums after the park. To read more, click here .
Colorado:

--A judge says a woman can proceed with her lawsuit against the city of Steamboat Springs over her son's death in a skiing accident. The Steamboat Pilot reports a judge on Thursday denied the city's request to dismiss Maureen Ryan's lawsuit. She sued over the death of her teenage son Cooper Larsh, who suffocated after falling head first into deep snow at the city-operated Howelsen Hill in 2011. To read more, click here .

Alaska:

--Climber Masatoshi Kuriaki flew into the Alaska Range last Friday to begin his seventh winter solo attempt on the West Ridge of Mt. Hunter. If he succeeds, he will be the first person to climb the route solo, in the winter. To read more, click here .

--For the third time in three years, the weather gods have driven Minnesota adventurer Lonnie Dupre back from the 20,320-foot summit of Mount McKinley . Dupre had hoped to this year become the first climber to solo the mountain in January. To read more, click here .

Notes from All Over:

--Eighteen people have been murdered just outside of Portrero Chico, a popular multi-pitch climbing area in northern Mexico. Though drug violence has happened nearby the world class crags, it has never come so close. Climbers are now fleeing the location. To read more, click here .

--On Monday morning, Grand Teton National Park rangers began a recovery mission for the body of a backcountry skier who died in an avalanche on Sunday, January 27. Nick Gillespie, age 30, of Jackson, Wyoming, was caught in an avalanche on the southeast face of Survey Peak in the northern Teton Range about 5 p.m. Sunday and died as a result of injuries suffered in the slide. Gillespie was a long-time seasonal employee of Grand Teton National Park who worked on the park’s trail crew for the past six years. To read more, click here .

--Meghan Arnold, 32, fell approximately 40 feet while climbing near Bridal Veil Falls in Utah's Provo Canyon last Wednesday and injured her head. Arnold died shortly after arriving at the hospital. To read more, click here .

--A 64-year-old Texas man died over the weekend after falling more than 1,000 feet while climbing a snow gully on New Hampshire's Mount Adams. Richard Gabrielle "sustained significant injuries that killed him instantly," according to a New Hampshire Fish and Game Department statement. To read more, click here .

--Wyoming's Sublette County Sheriff's office said 28-year-old Elizabeth "Liza" Gray Benson died after being caught in a small slide west of Bondurant and hitting a tree Sunday afternoon. To read more, click here  and here .

--Celebrated Polish climber Krzysztof Wielicki is attempting to complete the first ever winter ascent of Broad Peak, the twelfth highest mountain in the world. To read more, click here .


--The Boy Scouts of America may finally end their discriminatory policy against gay scouts and gay scout leaders. To read more, click here .

--Data Conversion Laboratory (DCL), the leader in future proofing content to be used in everything from eBooks to online training manuals and archived documents, has begun work with the American Alpine Club (AAC). The AAC will be digitizing the archives of three of its major publications for the climbing community: Accidents in North American Mountaineering, the American Alpine Journal, and its early predecessor, Alpina Americana. To read more, click here .

--Colin Haley and Chad Kellogg have completed a “Corkscrew” link-up on Patagonia's Cerro Torre without using any of Cesare Maestri’s aid bolts on the Compressor Route. By skipping the bolts, the team was able to complete another "fair means" route on the mountain. To read more, click here .

--A strong international team recently completed a new 35-pitch route in Queen Maud Land, Antarctica on Ulvetetanna (9,616'). To read more, click here .

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