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Fw: MedEdPPD.org February 2011 Newsletter

Posted Feb 12 2011 1:42am
 
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Sent: Wednesday, February 09, 2011 4:22 PM
Subject: MedEdPPD.org February 2011 Newsletter

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  February 2011

Dear Colleague,

A new clinical report recently published in JAMA recommends that during well-child visits, pediatricians should integrate screening for postpartum depression in mothers into well-child visits, according to a clinical report by the American Academy of Pediatrics' (AAP's) Committee on the Psychosocial Aspects of Child and Family Development. The committee argues that pediatricians who see parents and infants several times during the first year are well placed to help identify women who may need help. To help pediatricians and their staff to be prepared to meet this need, MedEdPPD.org offers The Pittsburgh Training Program for Perinatal Depression Screening . This activity, adapted from a live, full day, interactive training program conducted in partnership with MedEdPPD on June 4, 2010 by Dr. Katherine Wisner at Women's Behavioral HealthCARE, Pittsburgh, PA., includes 6 training sessions based on a comprehensive depression management model developed by Dr. Laura Miller, Director of Women's Mental Health Department of Psychiatry, Brigham and Women's/Faulkner Hospitals, Harvard University. Each interactive steps of the model are presented and discussed by a panel of faculty consultants and recognized leaders in the field. This educational activity, both the original live event and this web-based adaptation, has been made available through the generous support provided by the Staunton Farm Foundation .

Medical Updates
Report Promotes Depression Screening for Mothers During Pediatric Visits
Kuehn BM, JAMA. 2011;305(1):26-27.
A new clinical report recommends that during well-child visits, pediatricians should integrate screening for postpartum depression in mothers into well-child visits, according to a clinical report by the American Academy of Pediatrics' (AAP's) Committee on the Psychosocial Aspects of Child and Family Development. The committee argues that pediatricians who see parents and infants several times during the first year are well placed to help identify women who may need help.

Postpartum Depression
Saju Joy, MD. Medscape.com
During the postpartum period, up to 85% of women experience some type of mood disturbance. For most women, symptoms are transient and relatively mild (ie, postpartum blues); however, 10-15% of women experience a more disabling and persistent form of depression and 0.1-0.2% of women experience postpartum psychosis. Untreated postpartum affective illness places both the mother and infant at risk and is associated with significant long-term effects on child development and behavior, therefore, appropriate screening, prompt recognition, and treatment of depression are essential for both maternal and infant well-being and can improve outcomes.

Use of Complementary and Alternative Therapies During Pregnancy, Postpartum, and Lactation
Gossler SM, J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv.
The use of complementary and alternative therapies for depression is an issue of growing interest for practitioners who care for women. Postpartum depression is a serious and debilitating illness that affects many women, their infants, and families. Often, women do not report feelings of sadness or depression to their health care providers due to stigma. Some women have multiple concerns in using prescription drugs, especially if they are breastfeeding their infants. In addition, more women are educating themselves about the potential side and adverse effects of prescriptions drugs and are exploring complementary and alternative therapies. Two major concerns in using complementary and alternative therapies are the purity and safety of the herbs and herbal formulations and the potential lack of communication between the client and health care provider.

Induced First-Trimester Abortion and Risk of Mental Disorder
N Engl J Med 2011; 364:332-339
Concern has been expressed about potential harm to women's mental health in association with having an induced abortion, but it remains unclear whether induced abortion is associated with an increased risk of subsequent psychiatric problems. The finding that the incidence rate of psychiatric contact was similar before and after a first-trimester abortion does not support the hypothesis that there is an increased risk of mental disorders after a first-trimester induced abortion.

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In The News
Study Challenges Effectiveness of NJ PPD Initiatives for Medicaid Population
PerinatalPro.com Daily Blog; February 7, 2011.
The February 2011 volume of the journal Health Affairs, has published a study entitled "New Jersey's Efforts to Improve Postpartum Depression Care Did Not Change Treatment Patterns for Women on Medicaid". The title of the article, authored by Kozhimannil, Adams, Soumerai, Busch and Huskamp, is curiously conclusive in its declaration of outcome for this population of Medicaid women, given subject exclusions which weaken its findings and a perspective which lacks understanding of NJ's Maternal Child Health consortia system, the clinical course of PMAD's and demographics of those served.

No Higher Mental Health Risk After Abortion: Danish Study Finds Higher Mental Health Risk After Childbirth But Not After Abortion
CBS News HealthWatch, Jan. 26, 2011.
LOS ANGELES (AP) - Having an abortion does not increase the risk of mental health problems, but having a baby does, one of the largest studies to compare the aftermath of both decisions suggests. The research by Danish scientists further debunks the notion that terminating a pregnancy can trigger mental illness and shows postpartum depression to be much more of a factor.

Light Therapy for Depression
NewYorkTimes.com
Antidepressants like Prozac and Paxil are widely used to treat depression, but a much less costly alternative called bright light therapy, in which a patient sits under an artificial light for a set period of time each day, is not. Light therapy is typically recommended for seasonal affective disorder, the "winter blues" brought on by shorter days and limited sun. Some psychiatrists prescribe it for this condition, often as a last resort when patients fail to respond to drugs.

Value of bed rest for pregnant women questioned: Data don't back up prescriptions of bed rest
ChicagoTribune.com
As many as 95 percent of obstetricians report having prescribed bed rest or restricted activity to women with complications that may increase the risk for preterm labor, such as high blood pressure, carrying multiples and vaginal bleeding. An estimated 700,000 pregnant women in the U.S. are told to go on bed rest every year.

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Events Calendar
Ithaca PPD Support Meetings
When: Tuesday, February 15th, 11AM-1PM ET
Where: Jillian's Drawers, 171 East State Street, Center Ithaca Building, Ithaca NY

Med Ed Resources
Postpartum Progress
Promoting progress in treatment and comfort among sufferers of postpartum mood disorders, this blog is written by a woman diagnosed with postpartum obsessive-compulsive disorder after the birth of her son.

PPDtoJOY.com
A personal blog by Yael Daphna Saar who offers a wealth of personal experience, consultation and support on postpartum depression.

Marcé Society
The principal aim of the society is to promote, facilitate and communicate about research into all aspects of the mental health of women, their infants, and their partners around the time of childbirth.

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MedEdPPD.org Newsletter Archives
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