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One Woman’s Raw and Honest Take on Aborting a Child Due to a Medical Condition

Posted Nov 04 2009 10:02pm

“Bigger and better antenatal testing may thrill research scientists and be of enormous importance to those parents who are very clear in their minds about the kind of babies they want to bring into the world.

But for some of us, there is a grave danger that the very ease and simplicity of the tests make life-and death decisions too easy to take  -  and to regret.”  ~Victoria Lambert, brave mother who terminated her disabled child.    Daily Mail UK 

When we discuss the effects of testing during pregnancy, one of the main concerns the IDSC has is for the mother of a child who is diagnosed in utero with a Trisomy or other genetic condition.  In this article, Victoria Lambert, gives an honest and raw reaction to one woman’s take on having an abortion after she found out her child had a chance of having a medical condition.  She has bravely put herself out there, so that the conversation that needs to take place, can be started.  Victoria is exactly spot on about this.  The medical tests are out pacing this very important conversation.  The IDSC would like to make sure that we are a part of sparing more woman from this grief.  Taking their own child’s life does not take away the diagnosis.   The parents will live with a grief forever. They will be haunted by the “what ifs” forever.  Mean while, other parents who continue on with the pregnancy, are pleasantly surprised that the experience they have with their special needs child is filled with a joy that they never expected.  You see, all of us go through the same fear and sadness when we find out our children are going to be born with an extra chromosome, or a special need.  The difference is,  the women who terminate, often after they have been encouraged to, many times by physicians and other family members, never get to find out that this fear turns to joy!  The IDSC is committed to helping woman, who are in the same position as Victoria Lambert, understand that their fears are real, but that this too passes.  More often than not, it is their children are  the ones who show them the way back to that  joy.  Indeed, that is the irony.  Victoria Lambert, thank you for sharing your story.  We are grateful for your heroic honesty.  Now, it is time for all of us to hear you, and continue the conversation.  It truly  is a matter of life and death.

“Bigger and better antenatal testing may thrill research scientists and be of enormous importance to those parents who are very clear in their minds about the kind of babies they want to bring into the world.

But for some of us, there is a grave danger that the very ease and simplicity of the tests make life-and death decisions too easy to take  -  and to regret.”  ~Victoria Lambert, brave mother who terminated her disabled child.    Daily Mail UK 

When we discuss the effects of testing during pregnancy, one of the main concerns the IDSC has is for the mother of a child who is diagnosed in utero with a Trisomy or other genetic condition.  In this article, Victoria Lambert, gives an honest and raw reaction to one woman’s take on having an abortion after she found out her child had a chance of having a medical condition.  She has bravely put herself out there, so that the conversation that needs to take place, can be started.  Victoria is exactly spot on about this.  The medical tests are out pacing this very important conversation.  The IDSC would like to make sure that we are a part of sparing more woman from this grief.  Taking their own child’s life does not take away the diagnosis.   The parents will live with a grief forever. They will be haunted by the “what ifs” forever.  Mean while, other parents who continue on with the pregnancy, are pleasantly surprised that the experience they have with their special needs child is filled with a joy that they never expected.  You see, all of us go through the same fear and sadness when we find out our children are going to be born with an extra chromosome, or a special need.  The difference is,  the women who terminate, often after they have been encouraged to, many times by physicians and other family members, never get to find out that this fear turns to joy!  The IDSC is committed to helping woman, who are in the same position as Victoria Lambert, understand that their fears are real, but that this too passes.  More often than not, it is their children are  the ones who show them the way back to that  joy.  Indeed, that is the irony.  Victoria Lambert, thank you for sharing your story.  We are grateful for your heroic honesty.  Now, it is time for all of us to hear you, and continue the conversation.  It truly  is a matter of life and death.

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