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This is a long, long post on vac...

Posted Sep 29 2008 5:59pm

And the beat goes on: Vaccines

This is a long, long post on vaccines. I just thought it was important to share all this with you here on Bark N Blog about the vaccine issues, WOOF! So I can keep my commentary short bepaws the actual information is long and very important:

Vaccine Companies Investigated for Manslaughter
The Rabies Vaccine Can Be Hazardous to Your Pet’s Health
How Vaccines Can Damage Your Brain
Vaccinations Prevent Health
Vaccines and Immune Suppression

Now keep all this in mind as we travel down this vaccine path:
The problem is most vets, including board certified Internal Medicine specialists do not want to believe that it is real and do not want to say, “ IT is vaccine induced “. of course we all know this is for many reasons. http://www.dvmvac.com/HotTopic.shtml#skin

And now on with the vaccine issue:
Co-Trustee of THE RABIES CHALLENGE FUND ( www.RabiesChallengeFund.org ) and I (Kris Christine) have given Dianne (of jstsayno2vaccs group) permission to make several posts for me. My precious canine companion, Meadow, developed a malignant mast cell tumor directly on the site of his rabies shot at the age of 6 (syringe hole still visible in the tumor) and died in July after repeated surgeries failed to yield clean margins and the cancer metasticized throughout his body.

It is my goal to make available to all dog owners the scientific data on the known durations of immunity for canine vaccines and the adverse reactions associated with them so that they can make informed vaccine decisions for their beloved companions. In 2004 I launched a successful effort to change Maine’s rabies immunization regulations for dogs from 2 to 3 years and insert a medical exemption clause; later that year Representative Peter Rines introduced the nation’s first pet vaccine disclosure legislation on my behalf.

If anyone would like copies of the American Animal Hospital Association’s Canine Vaccine Guidelines, the 1992 French challenge study demonstrating
that dogs were immune to a rabies challenge 5 years after vaccination, the 2003 Italian study documenting fibrosarcomas at the presumed injection sites of rabies vaccines in dogs, as well as Dr. W. Jean Dodds’ papers on vaccinal adverse reactions, please e-mail me at ledgespring@lincoln.midcoast.com

PERMISSION GRANTED TO CROSS-POST my vaccine informational posts.

The [B]2003 American Animal Hospital Association’s Canine Vaccine Guidelines
[/B]are accessible online at http://www.leerburg.com/special_report.htm.

The [B]2006 American Animal Hospital Association’s Canine Vaccine Guidelines
[/B]are downloadable in PDF format at http://www.aahanet.org/PublicDocumen…s06Revised.pdf.
________________________________________

Ischemic Dermatopathy / Cutaneous vasculitis

A little known and often misdiagnosed reaction to the rabies vaccine in dogs, this problem may develop near or over the vaccine administration site and
around the vaccine material that was injected, or as a more widespread reaction. Symptoms include ulcers, scabs, darkening of the skin, lumps at the
vaccine site, and scarring with loss of hair. In addition to the vaccination site, lesions most often develop on the ear flaps (pinnae), on the elbows and
hocks, in the center of the footpads and on the face. Scarring may be permanent. Dogs do not usually seem ill, but may develop fever. Symptoms may show up within weeks of vaccination, or may take months to develop noticeably. Dogs with active lesion development and / or widespread disease may be treated with pentoxyfylline ( http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Pentoxyfylline&action=edit ) , a drug that is useful in small vessel vasculitis ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vasculitis ) , or tacrolimus ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tacrolimus ) , an ointment that will help suppress the inflammation in the affected areas.

Owners and veterinarians of dogs who have developed this type of reaction should review the vaccination protocol critically and try to reduce future vaccinations to the extent medically and legally possible. At the very least, vaccines from the same manufacturer should be avoided. It is also recommended that the location in which future vaccinations are administered should be changed to the rear leg, as far down on the leg as possible and should be given in the muscle rather than under the skin. ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vaccination_of_dogs )
____________________________________

A retrospective study of canine and feline cutaneous vasculitis

* Patrick R. Nichols_**Animal Allergy and Dermatology Center of Central Texas, 4434 Frontier Trail, Austin, Texas 78745, USA _ (javascript:popRef(’a1′)

* Daniel O. Morris_††Department of Clinical Studies, Veterinary Hospital, University of Pennsylvania, 3850 Spruce St., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
19104, USA _ (javascript:popRef(’a2′)) and

* Karin M. Beale_‡‡Gulf Coast Veterinary Dermatology and Allergy,
1111 West Loop South, Suite 120, Houston, Texas 77027, USA_
(javascript:popRef(’a3′)

* *Animal Allergy and Dermatology Center of Central Texas, 4434 Frontier Trail, Austin, Texas 78745, USA †Department of Clinical Studies, Veterinary
Hospital, University of Pennsylvania, 3850 Spruce St., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA ‡Gulf Coast Veterinary Dermatology and Allergy, 1111 West
Loop South, Suite 120, Houston, Texas 77027, USA

Correspondence: Daniel O. Morris, Department of Clinical Studies, Veterinary Hospital, University of Pennsylvania, 3850 Spruce St., Philadelphia, PA
19104, USA. E-mail:_domorris@vet.upenn.edu_ (mailto:domorris@vet.upenn.edu)

Abstract

Twenty-one cases of cutaneous vasculitis in small animals (dogs and cats) were reviewed, and cases were divided by clinical signs into five groups. An
attempt was made to correlate clinical types of vasculitis with histological inflammatory patterns, response to therapeutic drugs and prognosis. Greater
than 50% of the cases were idiopathic, whereas five were induced by rabies vaccine, two were associated with hypersensitivity to beef, one was associated with lymphosarcoma and two were associated with the administration of oral drugs (ivermectin and itraconazole). Only the cases of rabies vaccine-induced vasculitis in dogs had a consistent histological inflammatory pattern (mononuclear/nonleukocytoclastic) and were responsive to combination therapy with prednisone and pentoxifylline, or to prednisone alone. Most cases with neutrophilic or neutrophilic/eosinophilic inflammatory patterns histologically did not respond to pentoxifylline, but responded to sulfone/sulfonamide drugs, prednisone, or a combination of the two.
( http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1046/j.0959-4493.2001.00268.x )

____________________________________
Vitale, Gross, Magro (1999)
Vaccine-induced ischemic dermatopathy in the dog
Veterinary Dermatology 10 (2), 131–142.
doi:10.1046/j.1365-3164.1999.00131.x
_Prev Article_
( http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1046/j.1365-3164.1999.00130.x ) _Next Article_
( http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1046/j.1365-3164.1999.00154.x )

Full Article
Vaccine-induced ischemic dermatopathy in the dog
* Vitale,
* Gross &
* Magro
* 1Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, California 95616, USA, 2IDDEX Veterinary Services, California Dermatopathology Service, 2825 KOVR Drive, West Sacramento, California 95605, USA, 3Department of Pathology, Beth Israel Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Pathology Services, Inc., 640 Memorial Drive, Cambridge, Massuchusetts 02139, USA

Correspondence to: Carlo B. Vitale
Present address: Encina Veterinary Hospital, 2803 Ygnacio Valley Road,
Walnut Creek, California 94598, USA.

Abstract

Post-rabies vaccination alopecia associated with concurrent multifocal ischemic dermatopathy was identified in three unrelated dogs. All dogs received
subcutaneous rabies vaccine dorsally between the scapulae several months prior to observation of the initial area of alopecia at the vaccination site. All
three dogs developed multifocal cutaneous disease within 1–5 months after the appearance of the initial skin lesion. Cutaneous lesions were characterized clinically by variable alopecia, crusting, hyperpigmentation, erosions, and ulcers on the pinnal margins, periocular areas, skin overlying boney prominences, tip of the tail, and paw pads. Lingual erosions and ulcers were observed in two dogs. Histopathologic examination of the skin revealed moderate to severe follicular atrophy, hyalinization of collagen, vasculopathy, and cell-poor interface dermatitis and mural folliculitis. Hypovascularity was demonstrated by diminished Factor VIII staining of blood vessels. Nodular accumulations of lymphocytes, plasma cells, and histiocytes in the deep dermis and panniculus also were noted at the rabies vaccination site. An atrophic, ischemic myopathy paralleling the onset of skin disease was identified in two dogs. Histological examination of muscle biopsy specimens demonstrated perifascicular atrophy, perimysial fibrosis, and complement (C) 5b-9 (membrane attack complex) deposition in the microvasculature of both dogs with myopathy. Marked improvement of the skin disease was obtained with oral pentoxifylline and vitamin E.
( http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/doi/abs/10.1046/j.1365-3164.1999.00131.x )

____________________________________
The Armed Forces Institute of Pathology

Department of Veterinary Pathology
WEDNESDAY SLIDE CONFERENCE
2002-2003
CONFERENCE 19
26 February 2003
Conference Moderator:
Dr. Michael Goldschmidt, MSc, BVMS, MRCVS Diplomate, ACVP
Professor, School of Veterinary Medicine
University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, PA 19104-6051

CASE II - 2513-02 (AFIP 2839301)
Signalment: 5-year-old, male, castrated, canine, Chihuahua
History: One by three cm lesion on the dorso-lateral neck
Gross Pathology: None
03WSC19 - 2 -
Laboratory Results: None

Contributor’s Morphologic Diagnosis: Post-rabies vaccination alopecia with injection site granuloma and panniculitis
Contributor’s Comment: The hair follicles are markedly atretic and their lower portions are replaced by an eosinophilic, hyaline stroma. The deeper dermis also has a cleft or seroma pocket that is partially lined by a thin layer of foamy macrophages and multinucleated giant cells with more peripheral lymphoid nodules with many scattered dermal macrophages, lymphocytes and plasma cells. Scattered melanin-laden macrophages (positive with Fontana-Masson melanin stain and negative for hemosiderin with a Prussian blue stain) are in the hyalinized lengths of the hair follicles with a few beneath the epidermal basement membrane (pigmentary incontinence). This is post-rabies vaccination alopecia with an underlying injection site
granuloma
. Post-rabies vaccination alopecia is most commonly seen in toy or small breeds, especially Poodles, but Chihuahua cases have been reported. The lesion usually develops three to six months after vaccination. Other reports describe mild to severe lymphocytic inflammation with
macrophages in the superficial or deep dermis or scattered around hair follicle remnants. The dermis may have smudging of the collagen, especially around the hair follicles. Rabies vaccine antigen has been found in the hair follicle epithelium and in the walls of vessels in the area. One report of focal alopecia developing in all twelve of twelve inbred miniature Poodles injected with a killed rabies vaccine two months earlier suggest that there may be a familial predisposition to this apparently idiosyncratic, hypersensitivity reaction to the antigen.
( http://www.afip.org/vetpath/WSC/wsc02/02wsc19.pdf )

________________________________________________________

Permission Granted to Cross-Post.

MODEL CANINE CORE VACCINE DISCLOSURE FORM

Prepared by Kris L. Christine

Vaccines have played a significant role in enabling animals to live longer and healthier lives. Thorough evaluations of the risks of the disease, and
those potentially associated with the vaccine, compared to the benefits of vaccination for the patient, are necessary in crafting optimal health
recommendations that include vaccination.

The proper application of vaccines to animal populations has enhanced their health and welfare, and prolonged their life-spans. The risks to animal
health from non-vaccination are significant. However, vaccination is a potent medical procedure associated with both benefits and risks for the patient. Adverse events, including some that are potentially severe, can be unintended consequences of vaccination. Because vaccinating an animal which is already immune to a disease does not increase their immunity, but does expose them to the risk of adverse reactions, it is important to avoid overvaccination. Blood titers can help determine whether an animal’s antibody count is at protective levels.

The risks associated with the core canine diseases are as follows:

1. Distemper – high rates of morbidity and mortality from respiratory, gastrointestinal and neurological abnormalities; a widespread disease

2. Parvovirus – high rates of morbidity and mortality resulting primarily from gastrointestinal disease; this disease has worldwide distribution;

3. Canine Adenovirus – high rates of morbidity and mortality from liver dysfunction

4. Rabies – nearly universally fatal neurological disease. Infected animals are a potential source for human infection, thus vaccination is mandated by
law in most states.

The risks associated with vaccination are as follows:

Possible adverse events from vaccination include failure to immunize, anaphylaxis, immunosuppression, autoimmune disorders such as hyper/hypothyroidism, polyarthritis, allergies, transient infections, and/or long-term infected carrier states. In addition, a causal association in cats between injection sites and the subsequent development of a malignant tumor is the subject of ongoing research.

Optimal immune responses are obtained by vaccines administered singly three to four weeks apart rather than in combination shots. Single vaccine
administration also reduces the likelihood of adverse events as well as increasing the animal’s immune response. Only healthy animals should be vaccinated.

Except for the rabies vaccine, manufacturers’ labeled revaccination recommendations are based on limited scientific data and do not contain information on the vaccine’s maximum duration of immunity. The tables below contain the minimum duration of immunity data from the canine vaccine studies performed by Dr. Ronald Schultz, Professor and Chair of the Pathobiological Sciences Department at the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine, which form the scientific base of the American Animal Hospital’s 2003 Canine Vaccine Guidelines, Recommendations, and Supporting Literature.

If your animal experiences any of the following symptoms after vaccination, you should contact your veterinary care provider immediately: fever,
vomiting, diarrhea, uncontrollable trembling, lack of coordination, seizures or a hard lump at the vaccination site which doesn’t disappear after a couple of weeks.
__________________________________________________

Table 1: Minimum Duration of Immunity for Canine Vaccines

Vaccine Minimum Duration Methods Used to Of Immunity Determine Immunity

Canine Distemper Virus (CDV)

Rockborn Strain 7 years/15 years challenge/serology

Onderstepoort Strain 5 years/9 years challenge/serology
Canine Adenovirus-2 (CAV-2) 7 years/9 years challenge-CAV-1/serology
Canine Parvovirus-2 (CPV-2) 7 years challenge/serology

Canine Rabies 3 years/7 years challenge/serology

Data from Duration of Immunity to Canine Vaccines: What we know and Don’t Know by Dr. Ronald D. Schultz, Professor and Chair, Department of Pathobiological Sciences at the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine.

Note: Challenge studies are those in which an animal is vaccinated, isolated for a number of years, and then injected with high doses of virulent virus to test its immunity to disease. Serology is the method of counting antibody levels in the blood to determine an animal’s immunity.

Kris L. Christine
Founder, Co-Trustee
THE RABIES CHALLENGE FUND
_________________________________________

PERMISSION GRANTED TO CROSS-POST THIS MESSAGE.

In response to questions about Lyme disease in dogs and the Lyme vaccine, I would like to share the advice that Dr. Ronald Schultz, Chair of Pathobiological Sciences at the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine gave me for my 2 dogs, who both receive(d) (one died in July from a mast cell tumor which developed at a rabies vaccination site) 100+ tick bites a summer.

I was concerned after having contracted Lyme twice myself; however, none of the dogs we have had over 30 years were ever vaccinated against Lyme or ever contracted the disease. After getting it myself, I was reconsidering. Dr. Schultz advised me that there was far more risk associated with the Lyme vaccine than there was with antibiotics to treat the disease if one or both dogs contracted Lyme.

He further explained that if they tested positive for Lyme, but displayed no symptoms, then not to treat them with antibiotics because it indicated that
they had been exposed to the disease, but hadn’t contracted the disease. However, he said, that if they tested positive for Lyme and had symptoms
(lameness, fever, lethargy, etc..), then start treatment. Dr. Schultz elaborated by telling me that in vaccinology, immunology, the point is not to prevent infection, it is to prevent disease. In fact, low-grade infections are introduced to elicit immune responses, which is how vaccination works, by introducing an attenuated (weakened) antigen into the animal’s system.

Further, he said that a positive Lyme test in an ASYMPTOMATIC dog merely reflects the fact that the dog has been exposed; positive Lyme test in a dog with SYMPTOMS indicates that the animal has contracted the disease and needs treatment.

Based on his advice, I have chosen to not vaccinate my dog(s) against Lyme. Below are links to a few articles on the subject which may help you in
deciding whether or not to vaccinate your dog against Lyme.

Lyme, a “killed” vaccine, is associated with clinically significant adverse reactions. According to the 2003AAHA Guidelines (Page 16) (Attachment
#2), “…killed vaccines are much more likely to cause hypersensitivity reactions (e.g., immune-mediated disease).” Further, the AAHA task force reports
on Page 18 (Attachment #4) that, “Bacterial vaccines, especially killed whole organism products …..are much more likely to cause adverse reactions than subunit or live bacterial vaccines or MLV vaccines, especially if given topically. Several killed bacterial products are used as
immunomodulators/adjuvants. Thus, their presence in a combination vaccine product may enhance or suppress the immune response or may cause an undesired response (e.g., IgE hypersensitivity or a class of antibody that is not protective).”

Dr. Alice Wolf, Professor of Small Animal Internal Medicine at Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine, stated in an address (Vaccines of the Present
and Future ( http://www.vin.com/VINDBPub/SearchPB/Proceedings/PR05000/PR00141.htm ) ) at the 2001 World Small Animal Veterinary Association World Congress that Lyme vaccines : “are only partially effective and may cause serious immune-mediated consequences in some dogs that are as serious or more serious than the disease itself…..The most reactive vaccines for dogs include leptospirosis bacterin and Borrelia [Lyme]vaccine .”.

Canine Lyme, What’s New?
( http://vettechs.blogspot.com/2005/11/canine-lyme-whats-new.html )

No Lyme Vaccine for Charlie Nancy Freedman Smith, Maine Today
( http://www.mainetoday.com/pets/dogslife/006006.html )

“It is not a scientifically based recommendation to suggest that all dogs in Maine should be vaccinated with Lyme Vaccine. There may be select areas in
the state, “hot spots” where infection is very high and vaccination would be indicated, but dogs in most parts of the state would probably not receive
benefit and may actually be at risk of adverse reactions if a large scale vaccination program was initiated. Wisconsin has a much higher risk of Lyme than Maine, however at our Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (VMTH) we have used almost no Lyme vaccine since it was first USDA approved in the early 1990’s. What we have found is infection (not disease), in much of Wisconsin, is low (<10% infection). As you know, infection does not mean disease. About 3 to 4% of infected dogs develop disease. In contrast, in Western and Northwestern parts of Wisconsin infection occurs in 60 to 90% of all dogs. In those areas, vaccination is of benefit in reducing clinical disease. …….. Also, vaccinated dogs can develop disease as efficacy of the product is about 60 to 70% in preventing disease, thus antibiotics must be used in vaccinated dogs developing disease, just like it must be used in non-vaccinated diseased dogs. Therefore, in general areas with a low infection rate <10>50%) then the vaccine will be very useful. Thus, I believe it is irresponsible to suggest that all dogs in Maine should be vaccinated . Veterinarians should know, based on diagnoses in their clinic and other clinics in the area (town), how common the disease would be and they should base their judgment to vaccinate on risk, not on a statement that all dogs in Maine need Lyme vaccine!

R.D. Schultz
_______________________________
Ronald D. Schultz, Professor and Chair
Department of Pathobiological Sciences
School of Veterinary Medicine
University of Wisconsin-Madison
2015 Linden Drive West
Madison, WI 53706&Prime;

LYME DISEASE: Fact from Fiction by Dr. Allen Schoen
( http://www.drschoen.com/articles_L1_11.html )

“Research at Cornell University veterinary school brings up some suspicion that there may be potential long term side effects of the vaccine, though
nothing is certain. These side effects may vary from rheumatoid arthritis and all the major symptoms of lyme disease to acute kidney failure.” …… “Many veterinary schools and major veterinary centers do not recommend the vaccine for the same concern regarding potential side effects. ”

“I have seen all the symptoms of Lyme disease in dogs four to eight weeks after the vaccine and when I sent the western blot test to Cornell, it shows no evidence of the disease, only evidence of the dog having been vaccinated, yet the dog shows all the classic symptoms of the disease.” - Dr. Allen Schoen

LYME DISEASE by Dr. R. Staubinger
( http://siriusdog.com/articles/article3.php?id=146 )

“The Borrelia burgdorferi Bacterin from Fort Dodge Laboratories is currently the only licensed Lyme disease vaccine for dogs. …… In a limited field
study it was concluded that the incidence of disease (4.7 percent in infected, non-vaccinated dogs) was reduced to about one percent. However, the vaccine does not protect from actual infection. ……. We cannot recommend vaccination of dogs in endemic areas with the whole-cell bacterin until questions are resolved about clinical Lyme disease developing in dogs that have been properly vaccinated.”

( http://www.angelfire.com/biz/froghollerfilas/VaccBlanco.html )

This is a good article that speaks in general regarding the risks associated with vaccines.

In addition a friend attended the Dr. Ron Schultz (he’s the preeminent immunologist who has done much of the duration of immunity research) seminar in
March and this is a paraphrase of what he had to say about the Lyme vaccine:

LYME VACCINE - Recommends against, even in New England where 75% of dogs show exposure. Only 1 year DOI. At least 10% false positives. Impossible to really confirm lyme disease. Too many dogs get clinical lyme from the vaccine and it is more likely to cause a worse type of arthritis than the dog would get from lyme disease itself. The vaccine does not prevent infection and really doesn’t prevent the disease either. In Schultz’s opinion: “Lyme disease is a media produced paranoia.” Humanssuffer the devastating effects of lyme much more frequently than dogs. Most dogs will fight on their own. A predisposed dog will get a worse case of lyme if vaccinated than if not vaccinated. In a lab setting, studies show “some” protection. But in actual field studies, the vaccine seems pretty useless. Lyme is easily treated with doxy once clinical signs appear. Lameness/arthritis is generally the first to show up. Only treat if clinical signs of lyme develop. Tests are not reliable since few are adequately trained in reading lab results.

Anyone who wishes to have a copy of the American Animal Hospital Association’s 2003 Canine Vaccine Guidelines referenced above, please contact me at ledgespring@lincoln.midcoast.com . I highly encourage people to share this report with all of the dog owners they know!

The 2003 American Animal Hospital Association’s Canine Vaccine Guidelines
are accessible online at ( http://www.leerburg.com/special_report.htm ) .

The 2006 American Animal Hospital Association’s Canine Vaccine Guidelines are downloadable in PDF format at
( http://www.aahanet.org/PublicDocumen…s06Revised.pdf ) .
______________________________________________

PERMISSION GRANTED TO CROSS-POST THIS MESSAGE.

Regarding the Lepto vaccine, on Page 2 of the American Animal Hospital Association’s 2003 Canine Vaccine Guidelines and Recommendations, it states that “Optional or ‘noncore’ vaccines are those that the committee believe should be considered only in special circumstances because their use is more dependent on the exposure risk of the individual animal. Issues of geographic distribution and lifestyle should be considered before administering these vaccines. In addition, the diseases involved are generally self-limiting or respond readily to treatment. The committee believes this group of vaccines comprises distemper-meases virus (D-MV), canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV), Leptospira spp., Bordetella bronchispetica, and Borrelia burdorferi.”

Furthermore, on Page 7, Tables 1 of the AAHA Guidelines referenced above, it states under Revaccination (Booster Recommendations) that the Leptospira interrogans vaccine “….this product carries high-risk for adverse vaccine events.” Under Overall Comments and Recommendations they elaborate: “Anecdotal reports from veterinarians and breeders suggest that the incidence of postvaccination reactions (acute anaphylaxis) in puppies (<12 wks of age) and small-breed dogs is high. Reactions are most severe in young (<9 wks of age) puppies. Routine use of the vaccine should be delayed until dogs are >9 wks of age.”

On Page 8 of the 2006 American Animal Hospital Association’s Canine Vaccine Guidelines, it states that “Veterinarians are advised of anecdotal reports
of ACUTE ANAPHYLAXIS in TOY BREEDS following administration of leptospirosis vaccines. Routine vaccination of toy breeds should only be considered in dogs known to have a high exposure risk.”

A fuller discussion of the Lepto vaccine can be found on Page 14, in which it is reported that, “Immunity is an ill-defined term for Leptospira ssp. products. If immunity is defined as protection from infection or prevention of bacterial-shedding, then there is little or no enduring immunity.”

Leptospira, a “killed” vaccine, is associated with clinically significant adverse reactions. According to the 2003AAHA Guidelines (Page 16) (Attachment #2), “…killed vaccines are much more likely to cause hypersensitivity reactions (e.g., immune-mediated disease).” Further, the AAHA task force
reports on Page 18 (Attachment #4) that, “Bacterial vaccines, especially killed whole organism products …..are much more likely to cause adverse reactions than subunit or live bacterial vaccines or MLV vaccines, especially if given topically. Several killed bacterial products are used as
immunomodulators/adjuvants. Thus, their presence in a combination vaccine product may enhance or suppress the immune response or may cause an undesired response (e.g., IgE hypersensitivity or a class of antibody that is not protective).”

Dr. Alice Wolf, Professor of Small Animal Internal Medicine at Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine, stated in an address (Vaccines of the Present
and Future ( http://www.vin.com/VINDBPub/SearchPB/Proceedings/PR05000/PR00141.htm ) at the 2001 World Small Animal Veterinary Association World Congress that: “The most reactive vaccines for dogs include leptospirosis bacterin and Borrelia [Lyme]vaccine.”

Personally, I found the most stunning quote in this entire document to be on Page 18, in which the task force declares: “However, the ethical issue that our profession struggles with today is whether economics justifies giving an animal a drug (vaccines are biologic drugs) that is not necessarily required. As a minimum, we should allow pet owners to make this choice rather than make it for them.”

Anyone who wishes to have a copy of the American Animal Hospital Association’s 2003 Canine Vaccine Guidelines referenced above, please contact me at ledgespring@lincoln.midcoast.com. I highly encourage people to share this report with all of the dog owners they know!

The 2003 American Animal Hospital Association’s Canine Vaccine Guidelines are accessible online at ( http://www.leerburg.com/special_report.htm ) .

The 2006 American Animal Hospital Association’s Canine Vaccine Guidelines
are downloadable in PDF format at
( http://www.aahanet.org/PublicDocumen…s06Revised.pdf )
_________________________________________

PERMISSION GRANTED TO CROSS-POST THIS MESSAGE.

Regarding the Bordetella (Kennel Cough) vaccine, on Page 2 of the American Animal Hospital Association’s 2003 Canine Vaccine Guidelines and
Recommendations, it states that “Optional or ‘noncore’ vaccines are those that the committee believe should be considered only in special circumstances because their use is more dependent on the exposure risk of the individual animal. Issues of geographic distribution and lifestyle should be considered before administering these vaccines. In addition, the diseases involved are generally self-limiting or respond readily to treatment. The committee believes this group of vaccines comprises distemper-meases virus (D-MV), canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV), Leptospira spp., Bordetella bronchispetica, and Borrelia burdorferi.”

Further, on Page 14 of the AAHA Guidelines, it states: “Bordetella bronchiseptica (B. bronchiseptica): Bordetella bronchiseptica is another cause of the
“kennel cough” syn-drome. Infection in some susceptible dogs generally causes a self-limiting, upper respiratory disease and rarely causes life-threatening disease in otherwise healthy animals. Clini-cal disease resolves quickly when treated with appropriate antibiotics. Vaccination does not block infection but appears to lessen clinical disease, and vaccines provide a short DOI (<1 year) [table 2]. It is also unknown whether current vac-cine strains protect against all field strains.”

Duration of Immunity to Canine Vaccines: What We Know and Don’t Know, Dr. Ronald Schultz
( http://www.cedarbayvet.com/duration_of_immunity.htm )

The 2003 American Animal Hospital Association’s Canine Vaccine Guidelines are accessible online at ( http://www.leerburg.com/special_report.htm ) .

The 2006 American Animal Hospital Association’s Canine Vaccine Guidelines are downloadable in PDF format at ( http://www.aahanet.org/PublicDocumen…s06Revised.pdf ) .

Veterinarian, Dr. Robert Rogers,has an excellent presentation on veterinary vaccines at ( http://www.newvaccinationprotocols.com/ )
____________________________________

Note from Bark N Blog: Whew! A lot of doctor talk but we hope you have the information to make your own informed decision. As for us, we are not for vaccines at all. We also do not think any of them should be mandatory.

Have a pawsitively tail waggin’, vaccine-free day, WOOF!

Bark ‘N’ Blog is brought to you by Aspenbloom Natural Pet Care

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