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I don’t like talking too much ab...

Posted Sep 28 2008 7:07pm

Seizures & Fibrosarcomas with Vaccines

I don’t like talking too much about this stuff - I get scared, WOOF! But since all of us dogs are subjected to vaccines or were, then we want our humans to know this stuff so they can make better and informed decisions for our health, WOOF! The below was sent out and the message written not by moi, but by Kris Christine of the Rabies Challenge Fund:
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Muscle tremorscould also be a sign of seizures, and one of the potential adverse reactions to vaccinations is seizures — has your dog recently been vaccinated?

Significant calcium deficiency can cause seizure-like episodes, have you had a blood test to check calcium and phosphorous levels? High phosphorous foods (meat, eggs, nuts) bind with calcium, as do high oxalate foods (oatmeal) and may deplete your dog’s levels to a point where it will cause problems. Poison will also cause seizures.

You might want to do an online search for “canine hypocalcemia” or just “hypocalcemia”. This link ( http://www.lowchensaustralia.com/breeding/eclampsia.htm ) will take you to an article on this subject in which it states that the signs of low calcium levels (hyocalcemia) are: “Muscle tremors, restlessness, panting, incoordination, grand mal seizures and fever as high as 106.”

Further, the above articles thats a one of the possible causes: Poor Nutrition - “Home brewed” diets usually are at fault. The owner innocently may be adding too much unbalanced meat to the bitch’s diet, thinking the extra protein is beneficial. What’s really happening is the calcium to phosphorus rati is out of balance because the amount of useful calcium in the food is actually reduced! The ideal contains a ratio of calcium to phosphorus of 1.2 to 1. (Many organ meats such as liver have a ratio of calcium to phosphorus of 1 to 15!! Liver is great for dogs but if it comprises a large part of the diet, the
calcium/phosphorus ratio of the diet will be improper.)

If you have chickens, you should be aware that their droppings are extremely high in phosphorous and can cause a problem if your dog eats too many of them. If the droppings are charging your dog’s blood with phosphorous, it’s going to drain him/her of calcium in order to maintain proper pH balance and cause muscle twitching, etc…

Check this link HPA | Phosphorous | FAQs on phosphorous from the Health Protection Agency, especially this quote: “It has been used as a rat and rodent poison..”

Check this site Eclampsia (Puerperal Tetany, Milk Fever, Hypocalcemia) in Dogs “Eclampsia, also called milk fever or puerperal tetany, is an acute, life-threatening disease caused by low blood calcium levels (hypocalcemia) in dogs ….”

One of our yellow labs developed severe seizures after the second of his puppy rabies shots — his head shook so hard we thought his eyes would pop out, it was terrifying. After this seizure activity triggered by the vaccine, he became prone to them from other triggers. Whenever he ate too many high phosphorous foods (or chicken droppings), he would seize. Giving him 1/2 a quart of plain organic yogurt would calm his seizures within 15 minutes, when they were food-related.

Personally, I would have a complete blood count done to check for mineral levels if you don’t think vaccines or something your dog is eating is causing the seizures. PLUS, I would consult a Homeopathic/Holistic veterinarian for an alternative treatment.

Kris L. Christine
Founder, Co-Trustee
THE RABIES CHALLENGE FUND

PERMISSION GRANTED TO CROSS-POST THIS MESSAGE.

The 2003 American Animal Hospital Association’s Canine Vaccine Guidelines are accessible online at
( http://www.leerburg.com/special_report.htm ) .

The 2006 American Animal Hospital Association’s Canine Vaccine Guidelines are downloadable in PDF format at
( http://www.aahanet.org/PublicDocumen…s06Revised.pdf ) .
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Below is the Journal of Veterinary Medicine abstract of an important study demonstrating that dogs develop fibrosarcomas at vaccination sites, just as
cats do. Some veterinarians deny that dogs develop cancerous tumors at vaccination sites –this study suggests otherwise! The researchers used the presumed injection sites of rabies vaccines in the study. Anyone who wishes to have a copy of the full study e-mailed to them as an attachment, please e-mail me at ledgespring@lincoln.midcoast.com.

Kris L. Christine
ledgespring@lincoln.midcoast.com
Founder, Co-Trustee
The Rabies Challenge Fund
http://www.RabiesChallengeFund.org

http://www.ingenta.com/isis/searching/ExpandTOC/ingenta;jsessionid=1g0r0rorkwetj
//bsc/jva/2003/00000050/00000006&index=4
Fibrosarcomas at Presumed Sites of Injection in Dogs: Characteristics and Comparison with Non-vaccination Site Fibrosarcomas and Feline Post-vaccinal
Fibrosarcomas

Journal of Veterinary Medicine, Series A August 2003, vol. 50, no. 6, pp. 286-291(6)

Vascellari M.[1]; Melchiotti E.[1]; Bozza M.A.[1]; Mutinelli F.[2]

[1] Address of authors: Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale delle Venezie, Histopathology Department, Viale dell’Università 10, 35020 Legnaro (PD),
Italy; [2] Corresponding author:, Tel: +39 049 8084261, Fax: +39 049 8084258, Email: fmutinelli@izsvenezie.it

Abstract: Summary

Fifteen fibrosarcomas, surgically excised from presumed sites of injection in dogs, and 10 canine fibrosarcomas excised from sites not used for injection were histologically and immunohistochemically compared with 20 feline post-vaccinal fibrosarcomas. Canine fibrosarcomas from presumed injection sites were of grade I (3), of grade II (4) and grade III (8). Two fibrosarcomas from non-injection sites were of grade I, four of grade II and four of grade III.

Feline samples were classified as grade I (2), grade II (4) and grade III (14). All fibrosarcomas from presumed injection sites of both species showed
lymphocytic inflammatory infiltration located at the tumour periphery, while two canine fibrosarcomas from non-injection sites showed perivascular inflammatory infiltration within the neoplasm. All samples were immunohistochemically examined for vimentin, smooth muscle actin, muscle specific actin and desmin expression. All tumours were positive for vimentin. Ten canine fibrosarcomas from presumed injection sites and all feline samples contained cells consistent with a myofibroblastic immunophenotype. Aluminium deposits were detected in eight canine fibrosarcomas from presumed injection sites and 11 feline post-vaccinal fibrosarcomas by the aurintricarboxylic acid method. The present study identifies distinct similarities between canine fibrosarcomas from presumed injection sites and feline post-vaccinal fibrosarcomas, suggesting the possibility of the development of post-injection sarcomas not only in cats, but also in dogs.

Document Type: Research article ISSN: 0931-184X

DOI (article): 10.1046/j.1439-0442.2003.00544.x
SICI (online): 0931-184X(20030801)50:6L.286;1-
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Have a pawsitively tail waggin’, vaccine-free day, WOOF!

Bark ‘N’ Blog is brought to you by Aspenbloom Natural Pet Care

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