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Myth 3: 2% milk is now better for toddlers.

Posted Nov 04 2009 10:04pm

Image Week of July 16, 2008 the American Academy of Pediatrics basically said, “Since kids keep being obese we will change science to make them be skinnier.” For the past 10 years the AAP has been recommending whole milk, instead of reduced fat milk, for kids between 1 and 2 years of age. The reason was that whole milk is rich with fat soluble vitamins that growing toddlers need to thrive. But now, because so many children are showing up with unhealthfully high cholesterol levels, the AAP has changed their recommendation. They now recommend that toddlers drink 2% milk instead of whole milk (which is 3.25% fat). They reason that, in general, children are getting too much fat in their diets from other sources so why go overkill on the milk fat?

While the American Academy of Pediatrics is busily rewriting the rulebook against whole milk, the Canadian Paediatric Society continues to stand firm on a general recommendation for it. In summary, like everything else in life, there is no black and white when it comes to nutrition. Parents, ask your pediatrician an annoying amount of questions and make sure that you get a personalized recommendation based on your own child’s needs. Clearly there is no cookie cutter “truth” to this which-milk-is-healthier question.

Filed under: Nutrition | 2 Comments »

Image Week of July 16, 2008 the American Academy of Pediatrics basically said, “Since kids keep being obese we will change science to make them be skinnier.” For the past 10 years the AAP has been recommending whole milk, instead of reduced fat milk, for kids between 1 and 2 years of age. The reason was that whole milk is rich with fat soluble vitamins that growing toddlers need to thrive. But now, because so many children are showing up with unhealthfully high cholesterol levels, the AAP has changed their recommendation. They now recommend that toddlers drink 2% milk instead of whole milk (which is 3.25% fat). They reason that, in general, children are getting too much fat in their diets from other sources so why go overkill on the milk fat?

While the American Academy of Pediatrics is busily rewriting the rulebook against whole milk, the Canadian Paediatric Society continues to stand firm on a general recommendation for it. In summary, like everything else in life, there is no black and white when it comes to nutrition. Parents, ask your pediatrician an annoying amount of questions and make sure that you get a personalized recommendation based on your own child’s needs. Clearly there is no cookie cutter “truth” to this which-milk-is-healthier question.

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