Health knowledge made personal

Michelle Lin Medical Doctor

Specialty: Emergency Medicine
San Francisco, California
I recently started my blog (AcademicLifeinEM.blogspot.com) as a means to show medical students, residents, and practicing emergency physicians about what life is like in academic Emergency Medicine. A large draw for going into academia includes teaching, meeting and working with amazing people,... Full Bio
› Share page:

Posts

Sort by: Most recent | Name
Patwari Academy videos: Trauma primary and secondary survey by Michelle Lin Medical Doctor Posted in: Blog Posts in Healthcare Industry & Policy What's the primary and secondary survey in the assessment of the trauma patient? This is a great review of the methodical approach and insight in the thought proce ... Read on »
Simulation cases: How to write the storyboard by Michelle Lin Medical Doctor Posted in: Blog Posts in Healthcare Industry & Policy Last week I wrote about the important components in writing a simulation case . It is an exhausting list, but the thoroughness pays off. The next bi ... Read on »
Yesterday I had the pleasure of sharing my thoughts to an enthusiastic crowd of UCSF preclinical medical students on one of my favorite topics "Technology and Social Media in Emergency Medicine". This is the perfect target audience to teach about developing a workflow habit for keeping up with digital information, since they are only starting to grow their clinical knowledge foundation.

On the morning of my noon talk, I regretted not recruiting some fellow  FOAMed  (Free Open Access Meducation) supporters to email me their thoughts about why social media is here to stay in medical education. How great would it have been to share the collective thoughts of leaders in this area?

A Live Twitter Experiment
In a moment of inspiration/desperation at 10:50 am, I posted a question to the Twitter community to help me convince the students about the value of FOAMed in medical education. Why should medical students participate? What's the value?

At 12:40 pm, I started talking about Twitter by showing them what my Twitter feed looks like. I told them that I had posed a question to the Twitter community to share their thoughts about FOAMed, while nervously hoping that at least 1 person had responded. To all of our surprises, there were 20+ replies! Just seeing this scrolling list of thoughtful responses was far more powerful than any motivating words that I could have said to the students about joining the collaborative learning community of FOAMed.

Twitter sells itself when you see it in action. Imagine its potential.


I humbly THANK YOU all for responding and being a part of a virtual worldwide educator panel.

[ View the story "Why med students should join #FOAMed (Free Open Access Meducation)" on Storify ]

Note: In my powerpoint slide set, I apologize for omitting so many great sites in my EM Starter Kit of #FOAMed resources. For brevity sake, I just picked a few. I did, however, show them the weekly LIFTL Reviews which highlight so many more great resources.

Image source
Read on »
Trick of the Trade: Use the angiocatheter for central lines by Michelle Lin Medical Doctor Posted in: Blog Posts in Healthcare Industry & Policy Central lines come packed with a long introducer needle (pink arrow) to feed the guidewire through AND a long angiocatheter (yellow arrow). Most people cannulate t ... Read on »
Tweet Pearls of the Week 2/15 to 2/22 by Michelle Lin Medical Doctor Posted in: Blog Posts in Healthcare Industry & Policy [ View the story "Tweet Pearls of the Week 2/15 to 2/22 " on Storify ] [ View the story "Image Tweets of the Week 2/15 to 2/22" on Storify ] Read on »

O this learning, what a thing it is! 
William Shakespeare 

According to Wikipedia , MOOC stands for Massive Online Open Course, was coined by Dave Cormier ( @davecormier ) in 2008 during a course called "Connectivism and Connective Knowledge" in a course led by George Siemens ( @gsiemens ) and Stephen Downes ( @oldaily ). All three are educators from Canada who specialize in online learning, learning and technology, and connectivism. As the name implies the course is open to thousands of people online. Although thousands of people sign up only a very small percentage finish the course. 

The MOOC courses have 10-15 mins of video lectures recorded by professors where they go over concepts, examples, problem solving, and more. 

Videos:

What happens when you enroll in a MOOC?




I decided join a xMOOC (different from a cMOOC ) called “ Clinical Problem Solving ” which is offered by Coursera (no disclosure). The course is being conducted by Catherine Lucey, MD, FACP from UCSF. This is a great opportunity to not only learn more about clinical problem solving, but also learn how an expert in medical education teaches this topic. Dr. Lucey is a well known medical educator who has written extensively on this topic. The course duration is six weeks and this is the end of its second week.  In these first two weeks, she has offered great techniques and insight on how medical experts approach medical knowledge, diagnostic strategies, and illness scripts. She has also provided reference reading material to supplement the course. Interesting enough this course is also offering CME for its participants. I think it is important to explore these types of online platforms and exploit their potential to make asynchronous learning sustainable. 

Can MOOCs be integrated into medical school and/or residency curriculum? 



Additional Reading:
  • More on MOOCs and how it applies to Free Open Access Meducation (#FOAMed) by Chris Nickson ( @precordialthump ) "What is a mooc?"    
  • For a different concept of using online video for learning look into the flipped classroom .
  • Two great blog posts which explore clinical problem solving:
  • Emergency Medicine: A Risky Business by Simon Carley ( @EMManchester )
  • Metacognition for the Pragmatist by Lauren Westafer ( @LWestafer )     
  • Image source 1 Image source 2 Read on »
    Writing a Medical Simulation Case by Michelle Lin Medical Doctor Posted in: Blog Posts in Healthcare Industry & Policy It can be a daunting task to write a medical simulation cases. Regardless of prior experience in simulation, writing cases is a different skill set than program ... Read on »
    PV card: Bell's Palsy Treatment by Michelle Lin Medical Doctor Posted in: Blog Posts in Healthcare Industry & Policy


    Accuracy
    Valid for practice

    True to literature

    Overall quality


    Please peer-review rate this blog post by clicking on the stars.



    Bell's Palsy is an idiopathic unilateral facial nerve paralysis. Above is a video clip that I found on YouTube demonstrating the facial nerve paralysis.

    Since the 2009 Cochrane review  showing that antivirals added no benefit to corticosteroids in Bell's Palsy, I stopped prescribing them. The NNT.com site  has concluded the same. Looking at the literature a little more, the recommendations are a little murkier. Some groups are still advocating for antivirals for severe cases, because there may be a very small but questionably positive benefit.

    • 2012 American Academy of Neurology guidelines : "Because of the possibility of a modest increase in recovery, patients might be offered antivirals (in addition to steroids) (Level C). Patients offered antivirals should be counseled that a benefit from antivirals has not been established, and, if there is a benefit, it is likely that it is modest at best"
    • UpToDate: "For the subgroup of patients with severe facial palsy at presentation, defined as House-Brackmann grade IV or higher, we suggest early combined therapy with prednisone (60 to 80 mg per day) plus valacyclovir (1000 mg three times daily) for one week rather than glucocorticoids alone (Grade 2B)."
    • 2012 Otolaryng Head Neck Surg journal article : "The authors conclude that although a strong recommendation for adding antiviral agents to corticosteroids to further improve the recovery of patients with severe Bell palsy is precluded by the lack of robust evidence, it should be discussed with the patient."
    • 2009 JAMA meta-analysis : "Antiviral agents, when administered with corticosteroids, may be associated with additional benefit."

    What's your practice? 
    Do you add an antiviral agent for Bell's Palsy? 


    Feel free to download this card and print on a 4'' x 6'' index card.
    [ MS Word ] [ PDF ]
    See  other Paucis Verbis cards .
    Thanks to Dr. Kristin Berona (UCSF-SFGH EM resident) for the idea and notes!

    References




    View the real-time results of the Peer Review Demographics form.
    Read on »
    Trick of Trade: Umbilical foreign body removal by Michelle Lin Medical Doctor Posted in: Blog Posts in Healthcare Industry & Policy Emergency physicians are constantly challenged with fishing foreign bodies out of various orifices such as ears, as shown above in an earlier Trick of the Trade u ... Read on »
    Tweet Pearls of the Week featuring tweets from AAEM13 by Michelle Lin Medical Doctor Posted in: Blog Posts in Healthcare Industry & Policy [ View the story "Tweet Pearls of the Week Ft. AAEM13 " on Storify ] Read on »
    Article Review: A Tea-Steeping or i-Doc Model for Medical Education? by Michelle Lin Medical Doctor Posted in: Blog Posts in Healthcare Industry & Policy

    This is a great article written by Dr. Brian Hodges ( @BDHodges1 ) and published in Academic Medicine in 2010. Dr. Cunningham ( @amcunningham ) provided the link via Twitter in a discussion about different models of competence in medical education. 
    @ jvrbntz you like the idea of competency based education? see @ bdhodges1 paper for more journals.lww.com/academicmedici… :)@ mgacsm @ sean9n
    — AnneMarie Cunningham (@amcunningham) February 6, 2013

    This article starts out with a historical description of the current system, which was established in 1910 after most recommendations from  Flexner's report
    were implemented (prior blog posts on Flexner Report - Next 10 Years , Flexner redux 2010 ). The author describes the characteristics and implications of the current two models to assess competence -- time-based and outcome-based competence. He concludes by suggesting that a more accurate model will result from integration of what works best in both systems. 



    Time-Based Competence: 
    Tea-Steeping

  • This traditional model focuses on admission (finding the right candidate) and time-fixed curriculum (content) design.
  • It defines competence in terms of knowledge and reflection. "Tea (student)-steeping(medical school) for a set time and then voilà."
  • It's the model in place despite no evidence connecting it to patient outcome or trainee's competence.
  • Puts emphasis on summative assessments and subjective evaluations by supervisors.
  • Has proven quite resilient mostly due to political issues, and has a lot of emphasis on old established basic sciences.
  • Medical school officials are pressured to add more content to this already overwhelmed curriculum.


  • Outcome-Based Competence: 
    i-Doc
  • Focuses on functional capabilities of the end-product via standardization and efficiency. Production of "i-Docs" via the use of standardized examinations resembles assembly lines in factories.  
  • Originated in psychometric discourse now incorporated into production discourse.
  • Has led to loss of the mentor-apprentice model and lacks flexibility for the student.
  • Already being used to effectively train nurse practitioners which may take the role as sole providers in areas with physician shortages.
  • Performance under real settings is the ultimate display of competence.
  • Psychometricians provide methods which assess/measure the learner's performance via reliability, standardization, and multiple sampling.
  • Looks at training from a perspective of what's needed in a community.
  • The training of technical skills is undertaken in a modular process until the trainee demonstrates proficiency.
  • There is an emphasis on more frequent testing, integration of simulation, objective structured assessment of technical skills, and more.

  • Recent reports have addressed weaknesses and gaps in medical education in both Canada and the United States. A list of recommendations from the reports is provided in the article along with the author's description of the changes in the curriculum. 
    The author states there is a drive towards guided self-assessment with "continuous formative assessment and feedback in practice." There's going to be a new outlook on the lifelong learner and exploration on the specifics of external and internal assessments. The argument towards an outcome based model, as the time based model weakens, is about "increasing efficiency, shortening training time, and reducing the overall cost of medical education." Interesting enough this past summer New York University announced that it will  offer a 3 year curriculum to a small number of medical students. It reassures no loss of quality, lower cost, and efficiency in production. The YouTube talk below by Dr. Thomas Talbot on “Designing Medical Education for Today’s Brains” also calls for more effective ways of teaching the medical student with the help of simulation, technology, frequent testing, and emphasis on relevant material. 

     
    The solution?Outcome-Based Adapted to Individuals: 
    Swimming the Length of the Pool

    The author offers his recommendation in which the outcome-based training is adapted to the needs of the learner until the outcome is achieved in which time might be more of a variable. "This form of competence, what ten Cate has called entrustable professional acts , requires evidence of performance in real settings." The emphasis is not placed on what the learner has the potential to do, but rather on actually doing. 
    Another important characteristic noted by the author is that currently medical education places too much emphasis on what each individual does but the actual practice of medicine takes place in a team setting. See "Collective Competence" TEDTalk below by Dr. Lorelei Lingard (H/T Dr. Cunningham for the link) in which she talks about having competent individuals creating incompetent teams when they come together. For further reading on teamwork read Dr. Body's ( @richardbody ) stemlynsblog.org post .


    Ultimately, the author envisions a model that will reduce training time and cost while at the same time being flexible and individualized. It will tolerate ambiguity; handle complexity; and foster curiosity, innovation, and lifelong learning. The appropriate setting will be one in which there will be coaching , a closer teacher-student relationship, a curriculum rich in practice and feedback , continuous formative assessment , and a stepwise, developmental approach. The new hybrid model would be very time and resource intensive for the educator, because the system will go from a "see one, do one, teach one" model to a “watch until you are ready to try, then practice in simulation until you are ready to perform with real patients, then perform repeatedly under supervision until you are ready to practice independently." The author states implementing these new recommendations will be quite complex for the students, the educators, and the educational system. Fundamentally, he suggests keeping characteristics that work in the time-based model while adopting the best practices from the outcome based model.  



    Reference
    Hodges BD. A tea-steeping or i-Doc model for medical education? Acad Med. 2010 Sep;85(9 Suppl):S34-44. Pubmed .

    Sources: Image 1 , Image 2Image 3
    Read on »
    Patwari Academy videos: Searching medical literature to answer Qs by Michelle Lin Medical Doctor Posted in: Blog Posts in Healthcare Industry & Policy

    This is a great article written by Dr. Brian Hodges (
    @BDHodges1 ) and published in Academic Medicine in 2010. Dr. Cunningham ( @amcunningham ) provided the link via Twitter in a discussion about different models of competence in medical education. 
    @ jvrbntz you like the idea of competency based education? see @ bdhodges1 paper for more journals.lww.com/academicmedici… :)@ mgacsm @ sean9n
    — AnneMarie Cunningham (@amcunningham) February 6, 2013

    This article starts out with a historical description of the current system, which was established in 1910 after most recommendations from  Flexner's report were implemented (prior blog posts on Flexner Report - Next 10 Years , Flexner redux 2010 ). The author describes the characteristics and implications of the current two models to assess competence -- time-based and outcome-based competence. He concludes by suggesting that a more accurate model will result from integration of what works best in both systems. 



    Time-Based Competence: 
    Tea-Steeping
  • This traditional model focuses on admission (finding the right candidate) and time-fixed curriculum (content) design.
  • It defines competence in terms of knowledge and reflection. "Tea (student)-steeping(medical school) for a set time and then voilà."
  • It's the model in place despite no evidence connecting it to patient outcome or trainee's competence.
  • Puts emphasis on summative assessments and subjective evaluations by supervisors.
  • Has proven quite resilient mostly due to political issues, and has a lot of emphasis on old established basic sciences.
  • Medical school officials are pressured to add more content to this already overwhelmed curriculum.



  • Outcome-Based Competence: 
    i-Doc
  • Focuses on functional capabilities of the end-product via standardization and efficiency. Production of "i-Docs" via the use of standardized examinations resembles assembly lines in factories.  
  • Originated in psychometric discourse now incorporated into production discourse.
  • Has led to loss of the mentor-apprentice model and lacks flexibility for the student.
  • Already being used to effectively train nurse practitioners which may take the role as sole providers in areas with physician shortages.
  • Performance under real settings is the ultimate display of competence.
  • Psychometricians provide methods which assess/measure the learner's performance via reliability, standardization, and multiple sampling.
  • Looks at training from a perspective of what's needed in a community.
  • The training of technical skills is undertaken in a modular process until the trainee demonstrates proficiency.
  • There is an emphasis on more frequent testing, integration of simulation, objective structured assessment of technical skills, and more.

  • Recent reports have addressed weaknesses and gaps in medical education in both Canada and the United States. A list of recommendations from the reports is provided in the article along with the author's description of the changes in the curriculum. 
    The author states there is a drive towards guided self-assessment with "continuous formative assessment and feedback in practice." There's going to be a new outlook on the lifelong learner and exploration on the specifics of external and internal assessments. The argument towards an outcome based model, as the time based model weakens, is about "increasing efficiency, shortening training time, and reducing the overall cost of medical education." Interesting enough this past summer New York University announced that it will  offer a 3 year curriculum to a small number of medical students. It reassures no loss of quality, lower cost, and efficiency in production. The YouTube talk below by Dr. Thomas Talbot on “Designing Medical Education for Today’s Brains” also calls for more effective ways of teaching the medical student with the help of simulation, technology, frequent testing, and emphasis on relevant material. 

     
    The solution? Outcome-Based Adapted to Individuals: 
    Swimming the Length of the Pool

    The author offers his recommendation in which the outcome-based training is adapted to the needs of the learner until the outcome is achieved in which time might be more of a variable. "This form of competence, what ten Cate has called entrustable professional acts , requires evidence of performance in real settings." The emphasis is not placed on what the learner has the potential to do, but rather on actually doing. 
    Another important characteristic noted by the author is that currently medical education places too much emphasis on what each individual does but the actual practice of medicine takes place in a team setting. See "Collective Competence" TEDTalk below by Dr. Lorelei Lingard (H/T Dr. Cunningham for the link) in which she talks about having competent individuals creating incompetent teams when they come together. For further reading on teamwork read Dr. Body's ( @richardbody ) stemlynsblog.org post


    Ultimately, the author envisions a model that will reduce training time and cost while at the same time being flexible and individualized. It will tolerate ambiguity; handle complexity; and foster curiosity, innovation, and lifelong learning. The appropriate setting will be one in which there will be coaching , a closer teacher-student relationship, a curriculum rich in practice and feedback , continuous formative assessment , and a stepwise, developmental approach. The new hybrid model would be very time and resource intensive for the educator, because the system will go from a "see one, do one, teach one" model to a “watch until you are ready to try, then practice in simulation until you are ready to perform with real patients, then perform repeatedly under supervision until you are ready to practice independently." The author states implementing these new recommendations will be quite complex for the students, the educators, and the educational system. Fundamentally, he suggests keeping characteristics that work in the time-based model while adopting the best practices from the outcome based model.  



    Reference
    Hodges BD. A tea-steeping or i-Doc model for medical education? Acad Med. 2010 Sep;85(9 Suppl):S34-44. Pubmed

    Sources: Image 1 , Image 2Image 3
    Read on »
    Making Your Match Rank List by Michelle Lin Medical Doctor Posted in: Blog Posts in Healthcare Industry & Policy This is the moment your whole medical school career has been hinging upon:  Match Rank List Time! It is time to get serious and come up with a rank li ... Read on »
    Trick of the Trade: Recognizing eyedrop bottles by color by Michelle Lin Medical Doctor Posted in: Blog Posts in Healthcare Industry & Policy Have you ever wondered why prescription eyedrops have different color bottle caps? Did you know that the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) has a  policy to c ... Read on »
    Patwari Academy videos: Pediatric head injury - To CT or not? by Michelle Lin Medical Doctor Posted in: Blog Posts in Healthcare Industry & Policy When would you obtain a CT for a pediatric patient who sustained a head injury? This is a nice review, based on the 2009 Lancet PECARN study. In c ... Read on »
    Getting serious about Serious Gaming! by Michelle Lin Medical Doctor Posted in: Blog Posts in Healthcare Industry & Policy Many of our childhood memories revolve around late nights playing Mario Brothers. Everybody remembers their mother yelling to stop playing so much, or else thei ... Read on »
    Dexmedetomidine (Precedex) as an Adjunct to Benzodiazepines for Ethanol Withdrawal by Michelle Lin Medical Doctor Posted in: Blog Posts in Healthcare Industry & Policy


    Accuracy
    Valid for practice

    True to literature

    Overall quality


    Please peer-review rate this blog post by clicking on the stars.

    Sometimes a question is posed on Twitter that generates a great discussion from colleagues 'round the globe. Here is one such example.
    Who uses precedex for their EtOH withdrawal? What's your experience been? @ critcareguys @ criticalcarenow @ cliffreid @ emcrit @ pharmertoxguy
    — Ari Kestler (@arikestler) December 28, 2012
    Benzodiazepines remain the standard of treatment for ethanol withdrawal, particularly seizures and delirium tremens.


    Background
    Alpha-2 agonists that reduce sympathetic output may be effective adjunct treatment modalities without suppressing respiratory drive. Some older studies using clonidine demonstrated possible benefit. There are also several case reports and a small case series using dexmedetomidine (a parenteral alpha-2 agonist). Three larger case series were published in 2012 evaluating dexmedetomidine in this role. FDA-approved dosing is 0.2-0.7 mcg/kg/hr as a continuous infusion. [1]

    The Data
  • A retrospective case series of 10 ICU patients demonstrated safety of dexmedetomidine for ethanol withdrawal. Only 3 patients needed intubation, less benzodiazepines were required, and heart rate and blood pressure were decreased up to 10%. Maximum dexmedetomidine dose used was 1.2 mcg/kg/hr. [2]
  • A prospective case series of 18 ICU patients further demonstrated safety of dexmedetomidine for ethanol withdrawal when administered for a mean 24 hours. No patients required intubation. Time to resolution of alchohol withdrawal was 3.8 days, with and ICU length of stay 7.1 days, and hospital length of stay 12.1 days. Maximum dexmedetomidine dose used was 1.5 mcg/kg/hr. [3]
  • A retrospective case series of 20 ICU patients demonstrated a 62% reduction in benzodiazepine dosing after initiation of dexmedetomidine and a 21% reduction in alcohol withdrawal severity score. Only one patient required intubation. Dexmedetomidine was stopped in one patient who had two 9-second asystolic pauses noted on telemetry. [4]
  • Key Points
    While none of these studies had a comparison group, there are a few take home points worth mentioning:
  • Dexmedetomidine may be a useful adjunct to benzodiazepines for ethanol withdrawal patients (in the ED or ICU).
  • Reduced benzodiazepine requirements have been observed.
  • Dexmedetomidine does not suppress the respiratory drive and can be administered to non-intubated patients.
  • Bradycardia and possibly hypotension are the major adverse effects with dexmedetomidine use.
  • Translation to Clinical Care
    Some are using adjunct alpha-2 agonists with success (with benzodiazepines).
    @ arikestler @ critcareguys @ cliffreid @ emcrit @ pharmertoxguy Yes sir, I do! No bolus & titrate up. Less overall BDZ & res depress...
    — Haney Mallemat (@CriticalCareNow) December 28, 2012

    MT @ arikestler : Who uses dexmedetomidine 4 EtOH wthdrwl @ critcareguys @ criticalcarenow @ cliffreid @ emcrit @ pharmertoxguy Have used clonidine
    — Cliff Reid (@cliffreid) December 29, 2012

    Many institutions utilize nurse-driven alcohol withdrawal scales allowing them the autonomy to give patients symptom-triggered benzodiazepine therapy based on an objective score. ED nurses may not be as familiar with proper titration of dexmedetomidine, particularly in non-intubated patients. It may be prudent to have guidelines in place to ensure safe administration and good patient outcomes.

    References
    [1] Muzyk AJ, Fowler JA, Norwood DK, et al. Role of alpha-2 agonists in the treatment of acute alcohol withdrawal. Ann Pharmacother 2011;45:649-57. [ PMID 21521867 ]

    [2] DeMuro JP, Botros DG, Wirkowski E, et al. Use of dexmedetomidine for the treatment of alcohol withdrawal syndrome in critically ill patients: a retrospective case series. J Anesth 2012;26(4):601-5. [ PMID 22584816 ]

    [3] Tolonen J, Rossinen J, Alho H, et al. Dexmedetomidine in addition to benzodiazepine-based sedation in patients with alcohol withdrawal delirium. Eur J Emerg Med 2012 [Epub ahead of print]. [ PMID 23247391 ]

    [4] Rayner SG, Weinert CR, Peng H, et al. Dexmedetomidine as adjunct treatment for severe alcohol withdrawal in the ICU. Ann Intensive Care 2012;2(1):12. [ PMID 22620986 ]



    You can view the real-time  results from the Peer Review Demographics form .
    Read on »
    Cape Town Emergency Medicine YouTube Channel by Michelle Lin Medical Doctor Posted in: Blog Posts in Healthcare Industry & Policy


    In line with the philosophy and awesomeness of FOAM, Dr. Almero Oosthuizen and the  EM Physicians at Cape Town South Africa have created the EM Cape Town YouTube Channel for the purposes of demonstrating critical EM procedures. This great series was created with zero budget, limited time, and only with the use of an iPhone for recording purposes. This group is very passionate about teaching, and it shows through the videos.

    Watching videos is a great method to augment your readings about EM procedures and to reinforce learning. You can also watch repeatedly and pause the video when you need it. The creators of this video series have already uploaded many videos, particularly addressing the all important airway procedures.

    There are many positive things about the video series:
    What I would like to see in the future:
    General:
    This is a promising start to a useful online free resource for learning how to do EM procedures. It appears the creators may have extended the channel to also include important examinations (such as scaphoid injury). This video series is a little too long to be useful in the clinical arena for just-in-time-training, but is perfect for use at home especially in conjunction with a procedure textbook such as Roberts and Hedges. We look forward to additional videos!

    Rating = 3 of 5 stars
    Conclusion:
  • Good for novice learners
  • Great use of the internet platform for educational videos
  • Perfect to use while studying in conjunction with other reference materials
  • Nikita ( @njoshi8 )

    Read on »
    Trick of Trade: Needle foreign body removal by Michelle Lin Medical Doctor Posted in: Blog Posts in Healthcare Industry & Policy An IV drug user accidentally breaks off a 25-gauge needle in his/her forearm and presents to your ED for needle foreign body removal. How can you minimize the degr ... Read on »
    Patwari Academy videos: Toxicology by Michelle Lin Medical Doctor Posted in: Blog Posts in Healthcare Industry & Policy What is your approach to the poisoned patient? Listen to these 4 videos by Dr. Rahul Patwari to build your foundation of knowledge in toxicology. Introduc ... Read on »