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Lupus, healing and healers…

Posted Feb 12 2011 4:00pm

Believe in miracles?

I have lupus, and I believe in three kinds of healing miracles. True miracles can happen the wisdom of physicians, from the amazing design of the human body, or when God Almighty himself intervenes.  However, alleged human “healers” lacking medical degrees or deity leave me just plain skeptical.

Because of this, my own healing action plan has three components and a caveat.

Follow Medical Advice

First, I should follow the advice of wise and well-informed physicians.

They diagnose, instruct, prescribe and recommend intelligent courses of treatment and action that will improve my health. Some of these guidelines might even result someday in the near or complete healing of my lupus.

We are truly blessed by the wealth of study, research and applied medical knowledge handed down to us through the composite field of historical medicine. The fact that men can build on the knowledge of others’ past learning is a unique attribute of the human condition, instilled within men’s minds by their Creator. Fruits of recent research greatly improved my lupus.

Live a Healthy Lifestyle

Second, I should allow my lupus-challenged body to receive optimum nourishment, exercise, rest, environment and care to encourage it to heal itself whenever and to the degree possible.  Making reasonable efforts to improve my own likelihood of health is a pretty good action plan for improving my lupus, and can really encourage at least partial healing of lupus flares and physical injury.

The human body’s design, even in its present imperfect condition, can only be described as miraculous. Wounds heal, infections are subdued, bones mend, immunities are gained, circulation re-establishes, nerves reconnect all within the design of its fleshly frame.  The more I am forced by my lupus to learn about human physiology, the more convinced I am our bodies are a miracle. Not even lupus can completely undermine my wonder in the intricacy of biological mechanisms making up the human body.

In fact, I go way beyond thinking man’s creation was merely intelligent design, though that’s a great term of art in the creation v. evolution discussion I heartily agree with. However, I like to think of God’s handiwork as a simply miraculous design.

However, there is nothing I can do in my own power that will make the lupus in my imperfect body go away. Lupus is still at present, uncurable.  But, the healing laws of nature can work in my favor if given enough encouragement. 

Ask God for Healing

Ask God for healing...

Third, but not last in priority, I can ask God for healing from time-to-time, for myself and on behalf of others who hurt.

This isn’t such a bad idea. His answer may be “yes” or in His infinite wisdom may be “no” or even “not now.” His answer to my request for healing is not up to me, and I am okay with His role and mine in the court of heavenly petitions.

I get it. He is God and I am not. He knows things that I don’t and knows what is really best in a realm that I cannot. He is infinite and unsearchable, and I am at best, woefully finite! Humility and acceptance on my part are appropriate and contribute greatly to my own mental and spiritual health.

God’s great healing miracles also include those small moments when He reaches into the humble state of my own personal needs, either physically, mentally, emotionally or spiritually – giving some gentle touch of healing, wisdom, encouragement, courage or grace that transforms my own daily struggle.

His presence helps me cope with the daily difficulties of life and lupus. This is where most of my requests for miracles are focused. These small incremental miracles are what I am really allowed to perceive, when I watch God change my own heart, or grant me grace to transform a poor attitude or outlook. My perspective is woefully limited, but this healing is the most important type to me. This is the stuff my character is made of.

Yet, we have an all-powerful Creator who is able to re-create and repair any faulty portion of His creation, even in a gal with lupus, if and when it might be within His will and her best interests to do so.

Have Skepticism of Human “Healers”

The caveat?  I still remain a skeptic about human “healers.” I am unconvinced that healing is a choice or invokable magic spell, or that healing is the prize for great quantities of faith.  The latter is simply a very cruel and arrogant assertion toward all lupus patients, or other chronically ill people.  Other humans with audacity claiming to be “healers” perplex me.

I’m convinced it is who heals, directly or indirectly, through wise medicine, the body’s miraculous design, or God’s own determinate will.

Men may ask God to heal, but they are not the true healer. I have disbelief in any human “healer” claiming to possess or control a special power or essence flowing through themselves that can heal others.

Even more, I don’t believe God gives men the ability to tell him when He will heal.  Rather, He selects and designs some means by which to permit healing to take place.  In my “book,” and His Book, God alone gets the credit and the glory for that.  He is, after all, the Great Physician.

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