Health knowledge made personal
Join this community!
› Share page:
Go
Search posts:

Drug Addiction and Recovery : An Opioid Addict’s Experience

Posted Mar 29 2013 10:10pm
Thumbnail image for Drug Addiction and Recovery : An Opioid Addict’s Experience
The following account is the exact words of an opioid addict’s experience with drug addiction and recovery sent anonymously to Medical Island. The individual’s experience is a real eye opener for other addicts battling their way in and out of drug addiction

At the end of ten years of opioid use (including Hydrocodone, Morphine and Fentanyl patches), I had to make a decision.  My doctors were encouraging me to go on a drug holiday (why they call it a holiday I’ll never know – there is nothing fun about reducing or stopping your dependence on pain meds cold turkey).

I understood the mechanism and understood why I needed to “reset” my body in order to create a more effective pain management program, but I was the one who would have to suffer though the intense and painful withdrawals.  It was easy for the doctors to tell me to stop all drugs for at least two weeks but the process of withdrawal can be excruciatingly difficult, not only physically but mentally and psychologically.

Two years ago I had gone on another “holiday” and so I knew what to expect (I thought), but with the advent of the Fentanyl Patch I was in for a surprise.  Most withdrawals follow similar patterns for most people and with only a few exceptions withdrawals can be designated into stages.  If you’re an experienced drug withdrawer then you can count the days and minutes between stages with a perception of pain relegated to time sequencing for a more understandable process. But with added Fentanyl, all bets and preconceptions were off; this was going to be different and much more difficult.

The options for those seeking assistance are varied; there is a complicated process, balancing cost, choosing the right type of facility and needed programs. Many hospitals have internal programs (some outsource to professional managed care) that can last as long as six month with most lasting 30 days. To find the right program it’s a good idea to do your homework before choosing the type and level of service needed.

The first step for many is to simply type in a search using “ the Best Drug Rehabilitation Michigan “ (or your specific state); there are literally hundreds to chose from.  The next step is to read through the pages and try to balance what they claim with what you need and then compare cost and insurance options to minimize not only your initial costs but the long term costs as well.

Taking a few minutes to discuss these options with your insurance provider can eliminate a lot of unnecessary duplication.  If you have a good idea of what your insurance will pay for and what you will ultimately need the task of withdrawal becomes much more manageable.

In the end I decided to stay at home close the windows, get lots of snack food, plenty of fluids and go cold turkey.  My doctors didn’t advise this nor do I but for me it worked and I’ve been free ever sense .  I’ve even discovered that my pain levels lowered without the constant hype the pain meds fed my brain in order to feed the addiction.

Regardless of how you accomplish withdrawal, it is paramount to let your body determine its true level of pain and attempt to mitigate those natural levels using other natural means.  Our bodies do want to heal but as long as were addicted or dependent real healing cannot be accomplished.

 

Post a comment
Write a comment:

Related Searches