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A Review of Showtime’s Nurse Jackie

Posted Jun 30 2009 5:54pm
She Does What we Only Wish We Could Do to Some of our Patients

She Does What we Only Wish We Could Do to Some Patients

I recently watched the pilot episode of Showtime’s new show, “Nurse Jackie”, with the night crew. Jackie, played by Edie Falco, snorts crushed vicodin, steals money to give to the poor, forges an organ donor’s card, has sex on the job with the pharmacist who supplies her with the vicodin and flushes an arrogant jerk’s ear down the toilet after some choice words – and that’s just in the first episode.

In many ways – sex and drama aside – Nurse Jackie is the quintessential “take-no-crap” ER nurse that has served as an experienced den mother of sorts to so many young doctors and nurses still finding their way in the medical field. I still work with , and learn from, nurses like that, who continue to enlighten me with their experience, wisdom and knowledge. And no, I didn’t grab their boob or have sex with them in the supply room.   

On one hand, I fear that people will actually believe that nurses behave this way and treat them with even less respect.  I guess we will just have to leave it to shows like ER and Hawthorne to teach people to respect and admire the amazing efforts that nurses make to brighten, save and enrich so many lives on a daily basis in hospitals and clinics throughout the world. It is a noble profession that is too often the unsung hero. But back to the show …

Although it does present a flawed character portrayal of nurses, it is kinda fun to see someone act out what we all sometimes wish we could do with at least some of our patients. She has a distorted sense of ethics that leads her to do what will in the end be the most benefit to society in her opinion, and other times just gives people what we all know they really deserve. Except maybe her poor husband, but maybe the reasons for that will play out later.

From a doc’s perspective, I thought the whole Heimlich scene was coldly amusing. I get a similar feeling when responding to “Is there a doctor on the plane?”, because you really are never on vacation as a medical professional. It is a blessing, and sometimes it can be a drag, but no doubt it is wonderful to always be able to impact people’s lives – although not always in such dramatic fashion.

The nurses who watched it with me – male and female – enjoyed the show and were looking forward to future episodes. It presents an entertaining contrast to shows like ER and Grey’s where political correctness sets a border around the characters. So many of us in medicine hold back what we really think of some of the pathetic excuses for humanity that we see on such a regular basis from the the drug seekers, the self-righteous and those who feel they have the “right” to put us down, the domestic abusers who beat on their spouses, all the way down to child abusers and those who have children when they have no intention of doing anything remotely resembling parenting or loving, etc. It might just provide an outlet for those of us who bite our tongue and “do the right thing” even when it would feel so good to tell these people what we really think.

What I really want to know though is why the pharmacist has a bedroom in the hospital?

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She Does What we Only Wish We Could Do to Some of our Patients

She Does What we Only Wish We Could Do to Some Patients

I recently watched the pilot episode of Showtime’s new show, “Nurse Jackie”, with the night crew. Jackie, played by Edie Falco, snorts crushed vicodin, steals money to give to the poor, forges an organ donor’s card, has sex on the job with the pharmacist who supplies her with the vicodin and flushes an arrogant jerk’s ear down the toilet after some choice words – and that’s just in the first episode.

In many ways – sex and drama aside – Nurse Jackie is the quintessential “take-no-crap” ER nurse that has served as an experienced den mother of sorts to so many young doctors and nurses still finding their way in the medical field. I still work with , and learn from, nurses like that, who continue to enlighten me with their experience, wisdom and knowledge. And no, I didn’t grab their boob or have sex with them in the supply room.   

On one hand, I fear that people will actually believe that nurses behave this way and treat them with even less respect.  I guess we will just have to leave it to shows like ER and Hawthorne to teach people to respect and admire the amazing efforts that nurses make to brighten, save and enrich so many lives on a daily basis in hospitals and clinics throughout the world. It is a noble profession that is too often the unsung hero. But back to the show …

Although it does present a flawed character portrayal of nurses, it is kinda fun to see someone act out what we all sometimes wish we could do with at least some of our patients. She has a distorted sense of ethics that leads her to do what will in the end be the most benefit to society in her opinion, and other times just gives people what we all know they really deserve. Except maybe her poor husband, but maybe the reasons for that will play out later.

From a doc’s perspective, I thought the whole Heimlich scene was coldly amusing. I get a similar feeling when responding to “Is there a doctor on the plane?”, because you really are never on vacation as a medical professional. It is a blessing, and sometimes it can be a drag, but no doubt it is wonderful to always be able to impact people’s lives – although not always in such dramatic fashion.

The nurses who watched it with me – male and female – enjoyed the show and were looking forward to future episodes. It presents an entertaining contrast to shows like ER and Grey’s where political correctness sets a border around the characters. So many of us in medicine hold back what we really think of some of the pathetic excuses for humanity that we see on such a regular basis from the the drug seekers, the self-righteous and those who feel they have the “right” to put us down, the domestic abusers who beat on their spouses, all the way down to child abusers and those who have children when they have no intention of doing anything remotely resembling parenting or loving, etc. It might just provide an outlet for those of us who bite our tongue and “do the right thing” even when it would feel so good to tell these people what we really think.

What I really want to know though is why the pharmacist has a bedroom in the hospital?

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