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The Missing Link Between Gum Disease and Heart Disease

Posted Apr 19 2012 12:57pm

It’s medical dogma that having gum disease can cause heart disease. The most common explanation is that bacteria from your mouth can spread through the bloodstream and infect your heart valves (called endocarditis). The problem with this explanation is that endocarditis is a tiny fraction of people who have heart disease. Just because there’s an association, it doesn’t mean that one causes the other.

The American Heart Association recently reviewed 537 articles on this subject and published a review , stating that there’s no scientific evidence that gum disease causes heart disease, heart attacks, or stroke. Past studies were mainly observational, and not based on prospective studies. They also state that there’s no evidence that treating periodontal disease can prevent heart disease.

What’s the missing link? You guessed it: Obstructive sleep apnea. We know that obstructive sleep apnea can cause reflux and inflammation in the mouth. Mouth breathing due to craniofacial narrowing and inflammation also dries out saliva, which helps to protect your mouth from pathogens. If you’re missing teeth, then your mouth gets smaller, narrowing your airway even further. We also know that obstructive sleep apnea significant increases your risk of heart disease, heart attack, stroke, and death.

So it makes sense that if you treat sleep apnea, you’ll have less gum disease, and less heart disease. Obviously a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded study is needed to prove this point.

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