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Pumpkin Dinner Rolls and Change

Posted Oct 14 2010 11:02am

You may have noticed that the Banumpkin Bread recipe only calls for a 1/2 cup of pumpkin puree. What did we do with the rest of it? What we usually do, of course: We made bread! Dinner rolls, actually.

Are you getting sick of pumpkin yet? Well, you shouldn't. Not only is the orange stuff a popular fall ingredient. It's also packed with vitamin A, antioxidant carotenoids (like alpha and beta-carotenes), vitamins C, K, and E, and lots of minerals, including magnesium, potassium, and iron. ( Source )

You can use pumpkin as a healthy substitute for oil and butter in recipes (like we did with the Banumpkin Bread ). In this recipe, we used it to replace almond milk. (You'll see which recipe we switched up below.) Basically: Most anything wet in your recipes -- for cooking AND baking -- can be swapped with pumpkin puree. I haven't had any kitchen catastrophes (yet) using this philosophy.

And if you'd like to make your own puree, just follow these instructions !


PUMPKIN DINNER ROLLS

What you'll need . . .
  • 1 cup white bread flour
  • 1-1/2 cups whole wheat flour
  • 1 teaspoon coarse kosher salt
  • 1 packet (2 1/4 teaspoons) active dry yeast
  • 1/4 cup warm water (wrist-temperature)
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup
  • 1 cup pumpkin puree
  • 1 to 3 tablespoons soy milk

Method . . .
  1. In a medium bowl, whisk together the yeast and 1/4 cup of warm water. Let sit for 5 minutes (until frothy).
  2. In the bowl of an electric mixer, whisk together the white bread flour and 1-1/2 cups of the whole wheat, and the salt.
  3. In your yeast mixture, whisk in the maple syrup and pumpkin puree. Then pour the wet ingredients into the dry and mix using the paddle attachment. If the dough seems a bit too dry, add in -- 1 tablespoon at a time -- the soy (or almond/regular/etc.) milk. The dough should be smooth and elastic.
  4. Then, drip a bit of olive oil into the bowl (hardly any -- just enough for a light, light coat, use a spray oil if you have one) and cover with some plastic wrap and let puff in a warm place for 20 minutes.
  5. Preheat your oven to 400 degrees F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Set aside.
  6. When the dough is puffed, divide dough into 8 balls and flatten with the palm of your hand a bit.
  7. Place the rounds onto the baking sheet. They don't need much room to puff.
  8. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes. Until the rolls are golden brown.

Do these rolls look familiar? They should.

See it now?


This recipe is a creative spin on the quick-to-rise Wasabi Dinner Rolls we posted last week. It was as easy as taking out the wasabi powder and replacing the milk with -- that's right! -- pumpkin puree.

So, you may be getting sick of pumpkin. But I'm not. I want to stretch fall out for as long as possible.

Two years ago today, I cut off all my hair. It was super-duper short. And I hated it!


Stephen found some fossils on a hike . . .



And it was much prettier than it is today (most of the leaves are already fading/gone . . . and it's raining!)


Back to the hair thing: Whenever the seasons change, I always feel this need to change something about myself or my surroundings. Usually it's my hair. Sometimes I feel like I want need to change my entire wardrobe. Until we bought our house, I had often changed apartments in the fall, too.

It can all be rather exhausting and irritating, the urges I have. In fact, right now I'm trying my best to keep myself away from scissors. Ahh! I think I may dye my hair to calm myself instead. Though, I think this year's itch was scratched by overhauling our first floor layout . I hope, at least!

Do the seasons have a weird effect on you? Though I know many of you live in warmer climates, I'm thinking you notice a difference in the weather a bit, too, right? I've love to know if I'm not the only one. :) Just leave a comment or email us at neverhomemaker [at] gmail [dot] com .

Like what you just read? You can subscribe to the feed of these posts or follow us on Twitter or Facebook to be the first to know what the (never home)makers are up to. And we’ll love you forever!


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