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Juicy Tidbits 103: Ingredients {Plus a free printable shopping list!}

Posted Feb 25 2013 4:30am

Well hello there! In this juicing lesson, we’ll cover questions about ingredients – what should go in the juicer and what shouldn’t. I hope you’re excited because if you stick around, there’s a free printable and TWO recipes in it for ya! Let’s get down to business, shall we?

celery and apple

What can I stick in my juicer?

While other juicers may be different, I know that mine (the centrifugal type) doesn’t do well with soft things like bananas, avocados, and very over-ripe fruit. (I haven’t tried, but the instruction manual told me so.)  These items apparently clog up the works and you don’t want to put your juicer out of commission, right? I sure don’t.

Apart from soft produce, the options are limitless. Ideally, you’ll want to use organic produce to try to limit your exposure to pesticides. However, if that’s not an option, be sure to remove the skin on items that are part of The Dirty Dozen .

To help you get inspired, I’ve created a nice little printable shopping list of fruits and veggies I juice regularly. If you’re fairly new to green juicing and are scared that your concoctions will taste ‘too green’, you may want to pick more items from the sweet category in the list.

Juicy Tidbits - Juicing Shopping List

Click here to print the PDF.

What ingredients will give me the most juice?

I’ve noted on the shopping list above that fruits and veggies like celery, cucumber, and watermelon will give you heaps of liquid because they all have a very large percentage of water inside them. Other ingredients like berries and greens don’t yield a ton of juice when you consider their volume as whole foods. If you’re using a centrifugal juicer, I’d recommend adding a more juicy piece of produce like celery or cucumbers to your juicer’s chute immediately following the less-juicy foods in order to help them pass through easily.

Can I stick a whole unpeeled beet or a whole apple in the juicer’s chute?

While these contraptions can be really powerful, I always peel my beets prior to juicing them. No matter how much I scrub beets, they still feel a little dirty and I’d rather not have any nasties make their way into my juice. I also always use my pulp, and I don’t want any dirt in there either. For other items such as apples, feel free to stick the whole thing in. As long as it fits down your juicer’s chute, you should be fine. (I’m speaking from experience with a centrifugal juicer. My assumption is that the same would be true for a masticating one, but it would take longer.)

Granny Smith apple

Ok, that’s enough chat. Let’s get the juice a-flowing!

Both of these recipes are packed full of nutrition. The Zippy Carrot Juice has a nice little spiciness to it thanks to fresh ginger root, which you can adjust depending on how much you like ginger. (I’m a ginger junkie!) The Pink Panther juice gets its lovely purpleish-pink colour thanks to polyphenols and betalains, two antioxidants found in beets.

Zippy Carrot Juice

Zippy Carrot Juice

by Angela Simpson

Prep Time: 15 mins

Cook Time: 0 mins

Click here to print the recipe.

Ingredients (1 serving)

Instructions

Set up your juicer according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

Switch on the juicer. Begin feeding the ingredients down the chute, alternating a little of each at a time. (For best results, follow a harder item (like a carrot) with a soft one such as cucumber.)

Once the carrot, apple, ginger, and cucumber have been juiced, switch off the juicer. Add lemon juice, if desired, to taste.

To ensure maximum nutritional value, consume the juice immediately or store in an air tight mason jar in the fridge for up to 12 hours.

***

The Pink Panther

Pink Panther Juice - Eat Spin Run Repeat

by Angela Simpson

Prep Time: 15 mins

Cook Time: 0 mins

Click here to print the recipe.

Ingredients (1 serving)

Instructions

Switch on your juicer and pack the spinach into a tight ball.

Push the spinach into the chute, then follow with the other ingredients except for the lemon juice.

Alternate adding the remaining fruits and vegetables. I find I get the best results when I follow a harder item (beet or celery) with a soft one such as cucumber.

Once all of the produce has been juiced, switch off the juicer.

To ensure maximum nutritional value, consume the juice immediately or store in an air tight mason jar in the fridge for up to 12 hours.

fresh veggie juices

Ready to give one of these recipes a whirl? If so, I’d love to hear what you think. Come back and leave a comment below, or tell me what your staple juice recipes are. Do you tend to throw things in the juicer on a whim, or do you prefer to be more precise when it comes to measuring and combining flavours?

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