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Raw Peanut Dressing

Posted Aug 19 2009 6:27pm

Remember how I ate all the creamy out of the chunky peanut butter? I found a use for those peanut bits – and there was even some creamyness that I had missed. I made a raw salad dressing – well, raw except for the cooked peanut butter – but you could easily sub in raw nut butter instead..

Raw Peanut Dressing

08 peanut butter dressing raw

Ingredients

  • ~1/2 cup (raw) (pea)nut butter (you could use a different nut butter of course)
  • 1/2 teaspoon cumin
  • 1.5 tablespoons each of rice vinegar and apple cider vinegar
  • 1.5 tablespoons bragg’s liquid aminos
  • 3 cloves of grated garlic
  • stevia, to taste
  • 1/4 cup water (or more)

Directions

  1. Blend everything but the water in your food processor. Then add the water and use more if needed; adjust to your desired thickness. It will thicken more in the fridge.
  2. Serve over raw salads or use as a dipping sauce for spring rolls, sushi, etc…

This used up just about all of the crunchies that were left, so I used the near-empty jar for my morning protein oat bran (soy protein powder). Beans and peanuts are both proteins, but they combine as starch. This meal is actually well combined.

14 pb oat bran

Does anyone else have trouble digesting peanuts/peanut butter? I usually ignore the fact that I get gassy or bloated (TMI) after I eat them, but recently it’s been bugging me since everything else has been digesting so smoothly. I love peanut butter more than any other nut butter, but today I actually bought almond butter at Trader Joe’s ($4.99!) to see if that would work better.

Word origins:

  • peanut – the word was first used in 1807. Before then it was called  ground nut, ground pea (1769). Originally from South America, the peanut plant was traded into Africa and Peru (1502) and made its way to China by 1573. The term  peanut butter was first seen in 1903.
  • raw – comes from various words in Old English, Old Norse, German, and Proto-Indo-European; the various meanings were uncooked, raw, congealed, bloody, raw flesh, hard, flesh, not cooked, thick blood, thick fluid, serum. Not exactly the pure and healthy meaning it’s taken on recently, huh?
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