Health knowledge made personal
Join this community!
› Share page:
Go
Search posts:

PANCREATIC CANCER TARGETS OVERWEIGHT YOUNG ADULTS

Posted Nov 04 2009 10:05pm

 By Marie Dufour, RD - Being overweight (body mass index / BMI 25 to 29.9) before the age of 39 increases by 2/3 the risk of developing pancreatic cancer. Being obese (BMI greater than 30) before the age of 39 more than doubles that risk, say researchers from the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston.

But there is more. In their study of 841 cases, investigators found that obese and overweight individuals past the age of 30 with pancreatic cancer had reduced survival rates, regardless of disease stage. AND… they had an earlier onset of the disease (59 years old, versus 64.)

The odds of getting pancreatic cancer were doubled in smokers, even occasional smokers.

WHY? do we ask. Could insulin dysregulation associated with excess weight be one of the mechanisms for the onset of pancreatic cancer? It would make sense.

Every time we eat, the pancreas is put to work, in great part to produce insulin, but also to produce digestive enzymes that break down carbohydrates, protein and fat. Could repeated –or perhaps excessive– demands on the pancreas create constant irritation and promote cancer in susceptible individuals? It is quite possible.

Although the lifetime risk of developing pancreatic cancer is only 1.31%, it is a very aggressive form of cancer and is the fourth leading cause of cancer death overall. An estimated 42,000 Americans will be diagnosed with this condition in 2009.  Mostly, it is partly preventable by keeping a healthy weight, particularly during young adulthood.

So, watch your waistlines. Women with a waist circumference of 31″ or more, and men with a waist circumference of 37″ or more qualify as overweight and at higher risk for pancreatic cancer.

Reference: Li D, et al “Body mass index and risk, age of onset, and survival in patients with pancreatic cancer” JAMA 2009; 301: 2553-62.

Filed under: diet, cancer nutrition, diet, healthy lifestyle, Marie Dufour RD, nutrition, obesity, pancreatic cancer, weight control

 By Marie Dufour, RD - Being overweight (body mass index / BMI 25 to 29.9) before the age of 39 increases by 2/3 the risk of developing pancreatic cancer. Being obese (BMI greater than 30) before the age of 39 more than doubles that risk, say researchers from the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston.

But there is more. In their study of 841 cases, investigators found that obese and overweight individuals past the age of 30 with pancreatic cancer had reduced survival rates, regardless of disease stage. AND… they had an earlier onset of the disease (59 years old, versus 64.)

The odds of getting pancreatic cancer were doubled in smokers, even occasional smokers.

WHY? do we ask. Could insulin dysregulation associated with excess weight be one of the mechanisms for the onset of pancreatic cancer? It would make sense.

Every time we eat, the pancreas is put to work, in great part to produce insulin, but also to produce digestive enzymes that break down carbohydrates, protein and fat. Could repeated –or perhaps excessive– demands on the pancreas create constant irritation and promote cancer in susceptible individuals? It is quite possible.

Although the lifetime risk of developing pancreatic cancer is only 1.31%, it is a very aggressive form of cancer and is the fourth leading cause of cancer death overall. An estimated 42,000 Americans will be diagnosed with this condition in 2009.  Mostly, it is partly preventable by keeping a healthy weight, particularly during young adulthood.

So, watch your waistlines. Women with a waist circumference of 31″ or more, and men with a waist circumference of 37″ or more qualify as overweight and at higher risk for pancreatic cancer.

Reference: Li D, et al “Body mass index and risk, age of onset, and survival in patients with pancreatic cancer” JAMA 2009; 301: 2553-62.

Post a comment
Write a comment:

Related Searches