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my father in law has diabetes and has been put on a low carb diet , hes asked me to write a list of foods he can eat..


Posted by betbet

 
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Please take a look at this all natural low carb foods list.

Low Carb Foods List - 10 Choices For an All Natural Low Carb Diet

My 88 year old mother in law, Olga, was an insulin dependant diabetic for over 30 years.  Now, after 1 year on our healthy food plan, she no longer requires insulin shots.

Blood sugar management is essential.   This can be attained by consuming balanced meals and snacks with specific amounts of starchy and non-starchy foods.  In my practice at www.getnourished.tv I have a simple system and program for preventing and reversing Type 2 Diabetes.  Here are a few pointers to help you on your way.

 

When considering meal and snack preparation it is important to always keep in mind the High and Low Starch food composition.

 

"Low Starch" foods have fewer carbohydrates in them and have a low impact of blood sugar release into your system.  They also contain lots of vitamins and minerals and are high in fiber. These two factors will also help slow down the release of blood sugar from the higher starch foods you may also have in your meal.

 

 “High Starch” foods are higher in carbohydrates.  These have a quicker blood sugar release into your system.  It is CRUCIAL to watch your amounts of these.  Usually no more than ½ Cup per meal and snack.  Additionally, it is essential to make your starchy foods as close to nature as possible.  Instead of processed sliced bread, try 1/2 cup of lentils instead.  You get more nutrients AND fiber!

 

Combine your non-starchy and starchy veggies with a @ 4-6 oz. of clean lean protein (turkey, chicken, fish, lamb, grass fed beef) and 1 Tbsp. of healthy fat (olive oil) and you’ll have a great meal!

Below are some examples to make this more clear.

 

LOW STARCH VEGGIES – 1-2+ Cups Per Meal

Spinach   

Broccoli
Salad Mix   

String beans
Dark leaf lettuce   

Cucumbers
Arugula   

Onions
Swiss Chard   

Leeks
Kale   

Celery
Collards   

Red Pepper
Bok choy   

Green Pepper
Parsely   

Radishes
Beet Greens   

Cauliflower
Mustard Greens   

Zucchini
Turnip Greens   

Asparagus
Dandelion

Greens   
Parsley   

Green beans
Watercress   

Mushrooms
Escarole   

Brussels sprouts
Cabbage     

Jicama
carrot
daikon

 

HIGH STARCH – ½ CUP Per Meal  TOTAL!

Eggplant

Yams

Winter squash

Corn

Rutabaga

Parsnips

Celery root

Red Potatoes

Sweet Potatoes

Beets

Turnips

Artichokes

Okra

Non-Glutenous Grains

Quinoa

Buckwheat

Millet

Amaranth

Brown Rice

Legumes

Lentils

Kidney

Peas

Chickpeas

 

Tip On Grains - Avoid the "white" processed grains (ie breads) and stick to gluten free grains such as quinoa, brown rice, millet, amaranth and buckwheat.  These contain more nutrients and fiber than processed grains which will also help slow their release of glucose into your blood stream.

 

 

FRUIT – limit to ½ Cup & have with Protein fat combo ie – almond butter (1 Tbsp.) – consume away from meals atleast 30 minutes.

 

o   LOW Glycemic

§  Berries

 

o   MODERATE Glycemic

§  Citrus

§  Apples

§  Kiwi

§  Pomegranates

§  Cherries

§  Orange

§  Prunes

§  Pear

§  Persimmons

§  Apricots

§  Plum

§  Avocado

§  Nectarine

 

 

I hope all of this  helps.   Any questions please feel free to contact me at www.getnourished.tv

 

be well,

Sarah

www.getnourished.tv

That is simply not how insulin dependant diabetes works. Unless your mother in law has literally not eaten even minimal amounts of carbohydrates in a year, she will still need to take insulin. And not having any carbohydrates would mean never eating fruit, bread; even drinking milk. That is not healthy eating.
The previous comment was in regards to Cliff S 's comment

A number of doctors I personally know have had great success using low-carb diets with their diabetic patients. I also know many who have been able to lessen, or completely forgo their medications completely thanks to the low-carb approach. Naturally this is something that your FIL will want to workout with his doctor as the progresses. The easiest way describe what he should eat is this: low-starch veggies (no potatoes or corn), low-glycemic fruit (berries are best), protein (don't worry about fat... it's actually good for you and does not cause heart disease), limited dairy such as full fat cheeses, cream, etc. Milk is high in natural sugars which can cause an insulin spike, so he'll need to see how he reacts to that. Grains are not a necessary part of ANY diet and will simply raise your insulin levels, so he's best to avoid them. 

I highly recommend he (and you) read Dr. Bernstien's Diabetes Solution. He is a doctor who has lived with diabetes for 64 years and manages it with a low-carb approach. He knows his stuff.  http://www.diabetes-book.com/

NOTICE: The information provided on this site is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your physician or other qualified health provider because of something you have read on Wellsphere. If you have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 immediately.
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