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Milk as Sports Drink?

Posted Nov 04 2009 10:05pm

In athletes’ muscle recovery, is a glass of low-fat chocolate milk as effective as a high-carbohydrate energy drink? by Marie Dufour, RD

Apparently so, reports the American College of Sports Medicine.  In a small study of soccer players, low-fat chocolate milk consumption provided better muscle recovery after intense training than a high-carbohydrate drink of the same caloric value. (1)

After one week of normal training, followed by four days of more intense training, the two study groups were compared for measures of creatine kinase –a marker of muscle damage — and myoglobin levels, muscle soreness, mental and physical fatigue, peak isometric force of the quadriceps, and leg-extension repetitions.

The chocolate milk group registered significantly lower levels of serum creatinine kinase and greater changes in peak isometric force of the quadriceps than the high-carb group.

It’s hardly any surprise, looking at milk composition.  Carbohydrates and protein to help with energy replenishing and muscle fiber repair, but also calcium, phosphorus, sodium and potassium. 

I won’t discuss the benefits of chocolate, at least not in today’s blog.  But I will give a few pointers about the benefits of cow’s milk.  First of all, I advocate NON-FAT milk for adults and children over the age of two.  There is enough fat in the American diet to do without the fat in milk.  But the components of milk and milk solids work wonders for the human body. 

Low-fat milk consumption has consistently been linked to reduced risks of hypertension, coronary heat disease, colorectal cancer, obesity and its corollaries: insuline resistance and type 2 diabetes.

But a lesser-known fact is that milk is a source of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA).  This fatty acid has been shown to inhibit several types of cancer in mice.  CLA has also been shown to kill human cancer cells (skin, colorectal, breast)  in-vitro studies. 

So, when you go do the store to buy your muscle recovery drink, think of your entire body and get yourself some non-fat milk.  But make it ORGANIC milk, since CLA is only present in milk from grass-fed cows… 

Reference:

1 – American College of Sports Medicine – Gilson SF, et al “Effects of chocolate milk consumption on markers of muscle recovery during intensified soccer training” ACSM 2009.

Filed under: diet, cancer nutrition, diet, exercise, healthy lifestyle, milk, nutrition, skin cancer, sports nutrition, weight control

In athletes’ muscle recovery, is a glass of low-fat chocolate milk as effective as a high-carbohydrate energy drink? by Marie Dufour, RD

Apparently so, reports the American College of Sports Medicine.  In a small study of soccer players, low-fat chocolate milk consumption provided better muscle recovery after intense training than a high-carbohydrate drink of the same caloric value. (1)

After one week of normal training, followed by four days of more intense training, the two study groups were compared for measures of creatine kinase –a marker of muscle damage — and myoglobin levels, muscle soreness, mental and physical fatigue, peak isometric force of the quadriceps, and leg-extension repetitions.

The chocolate milk group registered significantly lower levels of serum creatinine kinase and greater changes in peak isometric force of the quadriceps than the high-carb group.

It’s hardly any surprise, looking at milk composition.  Carbohydrates and protein to help with energy replenishing and muscle fiber repair, but also calcium, phosphorus, sodium and potassium. 

I won’t discuss the benefits of chocolate, at least not in today’s blog.  But I will give a few pointers about the benefits of cow’s milk.  First of all, I advocate NON-FAT milk for adults and children over the age of two.  There is enough fat in the American diet to do without the fat in milk.  But the components of milk and milk solids work wonders for the human body. 

Low-fat milk consumption has consistently been linked to reduced risks of hypertension, coronary heat disease, colorectal cancer, obesity and its corollaries: insuline resistance and type 2 diabetes.

But a lesser-known fact is that milk is a source of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA).  This fatty acid has been shown to inhibit several types of cancer in mice.  CLA has also been shown to kill human cancer cells (skin, colorectal, breast)  in-vitro studies. 

So, when you go do the store to buy your muscle recovery drink, think of your entire body and get yourself some non-fat milk.  But make it ORGANIC milk, since CLA is only present in milk from grass-fed cows… 

Reference:

1 – American College of Sports Medicine – Gilson SF, et al “Effects of chocolate milk consumption on markers of muscle recovery during intensified soccer training” ACSM 2009.

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