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Eggs and Eating Healthy Nutritious Food

Posted Apr 30 2008 11:01pm
If you are a regular visitor to Eating Healthy Nutritious Food, then you know that I am a huge encourager towards a living food diet, including gobs of fruits and veggies. However, in the same breath, I am NOT a vegetarian or a vegan. So, if you like visiting us here, and you are a vegitarian, please just bear with us today while we explore the benefits of EGGS. Come back by next time, and I'm sure you'll be admonished and encouraged...per my usual fare!





Eggs are available year round to provide not only delicious meals on their own but as an essential ingredient for the many baked goods and sauces that would never be the same without them. They are perfect for eating healthy nutritious food.







Composed of a yellow yolk and translucent white surrounded by a protective shell, the incredible nature of the egg is partially found in their unique food chemistry which allows them help in coagulation, foaming, emulsification and browning.



Eggs are a good source of low-cost
high-quality protein, providing 5.5 grams of protein (11.1% of the daily value for protein) in one egg for a caloric cost of only 68 calories. The structure of humans and animals is built on protein. We rely on animal and vegetable protein for our supply of amino acids, and then our bodies rearrange the nitrogen to create the pattern of amino acids we require.



Another health benefit of eggs is their contribution to the diet as a source of
choline. Although our bodies can produce some choline, we cannot make enough to make up for an inadequate supply in our diets, and choline deficiency can also cause deficiency of another B vitamin critically important for health, folic acid.



Choline is definitely a nutrient needed in good supply for good health. Choline is a key component of many fat-containing structures in cell membranes, whose flexibility and integrity depend on adequate supplies of choline. Two fat-like molecules in the brain, phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin, account for an unusually high percentage of the brain's total mass, so choline is particularly important for brain function and health.





Eggs are high in
cholesterol, and health experts in the past counseled people to therefore avoid this food. (All of the cholesterol in the egg is in the yolk.) However, nutrition experts have now determined people on a low-fat diet can eat one or two eggs a day without measurable changes in their blood cholesterol levels. This information is supported by a statistical analysis of 224 dietary studies carried out over the past 25 years that investigated the relationship between diet and blood cholesterol levels in over 8,000 subjects. What investigators in this study found was that saturated fat in the diet, not dietary cholesterol, is what influences blood cholesterol levels the most.



A Few Quick Serving Ideas:

Hard-boiled eggs are fun to eat and easy to pack for on-the-go lunches.

Mix chopped up hard-boiled eggs with fresh lemon juice and olive oil, leeks and dill (and salt and pepper to taste) to make a healthy egg salad.

Instead of Eggs Benedict, make Eggs "Buenodict." Place a poached egg on top of a whole grain English muffin lined with steamed spinach. Top with salsa or any of your favorite seasonings and enjoy.

Say olé to the day with a huevos ranchero breakfast. Add chili peppers to scrambled eggs and serve with black beans and corn tortillas.



(above info found on
http://www.whfoods.org/ - The World's Healthiest Foods website, and one of my absolute favorite sites too!!)



**Allergy Warning(merry's comment)**

Eggs seem to be a common allergen, especially in infants. You won't have to go far to find a mom who can testify to giving her hungry 9 month old scrambled eggs, only to turn around and find their face all blotchy and red after they gobbled it down gladly!

If you have known food allergies, eggs can be a possible cause. Be carful (especially with those little ones). My kids outgrew that allergy and all eat eggs without problem now.












Merry K.
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