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Yes. That Happened. (And It's Still Happening.)

Posted Apr 14 2011 7:20am
Yesterday Jamie Oliver tweeted at me.*
*Please insert a gazillion and four exclamation points to show my crazed excitement and surreal feeling of oh my goll, did that really just happen?
Again, can I say it?

Oh.
My.
Goll.

[Maybe this doesn't seem like a big deal, but I'm not really one to understand if celebrities actually will tweet back at you. He's just one of my idols in food for all that he's trying to do for the kids of this country---and their families---so it was pretty amazing to me.]

I was obsessed with Jamie Oliver's Food Revolution last spring, and mentioned it on numerous occasions . By now, you probably aren't surprised that I followed his efforts with such passion, as I've talked a lot about the food my kids eat at school, and my efforts to educate them in any small way about healthy choices. I wrote a post last summer detailing some of the reasons why I'm so interested in the issue, which you can read here .
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Just last weekend, I went to see the documentary Lunch Line, which only served to reinvigorate my frustration at our inability to come up with a solution to serving the kids in need of food not just any old mess, but good, healthy food.

I'm not going to chronicle the entire episode for you, mostly because I feel like I blabber on about this all the time and you're probably sick of it. However, here are some shocking highlights (although we should call them lowlights)
Jamie makes a healthier burger at a fast food joint that even the owner agrees tastes better (and we actually know where the meat comes from...not just from "the guy...at the plant...making the burgers...you know, at that place..."*).
*almost direct quote from the owner
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Unfortunately, 'good' meat is too expensive to be feasible, as even the customers say they'd pay less money for the less tasty meal, rather than shell out more cash for the higher quality burger.
[ Source ]Speaking of meat money....Jamie demonstrated the value of a cow's beef by painting the price earned from each part.
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All the stuff that doesn't earn money? The 'sh$t,' as chefs call it, and the "pink slime" as it is known in more appropriate terms---which is the ends, the entrails, the gross stuff that no one wants and butchers actually pay people to take away---well, it's cleaned with ammonia, ground up, and then allowed in schools by the USDA, where it's found in burgers, and tacos, and spaghetti.
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And we can't forget about the 57 tons of sugar Jamie dumped on a bus to represent the amount of sugar kids consume in one school, in one week, from only flavored milk. [Who knows how much is consumed from other sources...]
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If you missed the first episode, I suggest you stop what you are doing (OK, if you're at work...well, I'll let you wait until you get home) and watch it now . [It's on Hulu and ABC .] In the meantime, you can sign the online petition "I support the Food Revolution.
America's kids need better food at school and better health prospects.
We need to keep cooking skills alive."
Then set your DVR or TV for next Tuesday at 8/7c so you can follow along on this journey with me....and what should be the rest of America.
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