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The Magical Magic of Castor Oil

Posted Nov 17 2009 3:23pm 3 Comments

IMG_6804

I am back from Ohio and what a holiday it was! Who knew Southern Ohio was a mecca for beauty, artists, ethical growers, hiking, biking, markets and other delightfulness. This nutritionista sure didn’t.   Obviously, this is only the first of many Ohizza inspired posts. Let’s get down to business.

On Sunday, because the rain let up and we had heard of a beautiful bike path along the Ohio river, we loaded up some bicycles and headed on over.

IMG_6776 See… beautiful. Towards the end of the ride, we came to an absolutely beautiful and well loved community garden, so we thought we’d leave our bikes and have a wander. IMG_6801 That is how I found this Castor Plant.

IMG_6802 I’ll be the first to admit that I have been misinforming people about the origins of castor oil. I thought it came from a bean! My very wise companion on this community garden exploration kindly righted my wrongs and I now know better.

Castor oil is amazing. It is one of those items that is always by my bed and in my bathroom. It is my go-to remedy for almost everything skin and immune related and can be viewed as an alternative to cortisone or antibiotic creams. The ricinoleic acid in castor oil prevents the growth of bacteria, yeast, and viruses. When I have joint pain anywhere, I rub it on the joints, if I have swollen glands, I massage it into neck/gland area, if I am feeling a little backed up- on to my belly it goes (massaged in a clockwise direction- the same direction stuffy moves through the large intestine). With a cold or congestion, I’ll mix in a little comfrey and eucalyptus and massage it into my chest. Be warned- it will stain your clothes so out on the old and uglies for this one.

Castor oil has many beneficial uses in health and beauty products as well as in industrial uses. Gots to be focussing on health here though, so here it goes:

Taken Internally

  • Has a laxative effect (anyone who grew up in the West Indies, India or some South American countries will likely have vile memories of lining up with their siblings to take down a spoonful of this bitterness).
  • Help the intestinal system with inflammatory bowels and dysentery.
  • It is said to increase the appetites of the ill
  • Destroy mucous to cure runny noses and congestion.

Topically

  • A castor oil soaked bandage can remove swelling and infection from any wounds includingringworm, inflammation, and  sun burns.  (The best way to use this as a topical cream is to pre soak the infected area with Epsom salt to soften the skin, then wrap the area with a cotton cloth soaked in castor oil- worked like a charm when I burnt my arm this summer).
  • Castor seeds or roots boiled into a topical poultice are applied liberally to rheumatic and arthritic swellings.
  • Massaging the body with castor oil prior to a bath once a week will help the skin retain its natural healing properties as well as stimulate the body’s muscles and internal organs.
  • Rubbing castor oil on hands and feet at night will help maintain healthy and soft skin, as well as reduce callous and dry skin.

Castor Oil Packs

And at last, my great grand-diddy of healing practices- the Castor Oil Pack! Take a cotton flannel or cloth and soak with castor oil. Apply to the skin that you wish to detoxify or increase energy flow, cover with a little plastic and then lay on a hot water bottle or heat pack. Leave it on for anywhere from 20 minutes to an hour and just chillax while this is going down. Castor oil packs soaked through the skin and improve the body’s ability to assimilate nutrients, eliminate toxins, and stimulate circulation.The castor oil pack can be repeated many times, so the pack is not thrown away. This can be done daily, three times a week- whatever floats your boat.

And here are some more pics from that beautiful garden.

Snack time!

IMG_6799
I imagine this is a large squash of some kind… but I can’t be sure. IMG_6798

Pretty as a flower. IMG_6795

Chard and Kale = Lunch time IMG_6806

Win a bag of My Favourite Granola if you can correctly identify this purple bean. Here is your clue: the beans inside were green. The first to get it right, with a source for your answer, will win the goods! IMG_6807

More to come soon. And I’ll bet you’re wondering who my wise bicycle/garden snooping companion was. He/She makes an appearance in the very first picture at top…. in the reflection of my sunglasses. Soon, soon ladies and gents.

IMG_6804

I am back from Ohio and what a holiday it was! Who knew Southern Ohio was a mecca for beauty, artists, ethical growers, hiking, biking, markets and other delightfulness. This nutritionista sure didn’t.   Obviously, this is only the first of many Ohizza inspired posts. Let’s get down to business.

On Sunday, because the rain let up and we had heard of a beautiful bike path along the Ohio river, we loaded up some bicycles and headed on over.

IMG_6776 See… beautiful. Towards the end of the ride, we came to an absolutely beautiful and well loved community garden, so we thought we’d leave our bikes and have a wander. IMG_6801 That is how I found this Castor Plant.

IMG_6802 I’ll be the first to admit that I have been misinforming people about the origins of castor oil. I thought it came from a bean! My very wise companion on this community garden exploration kindly righted my wrongs and I now know better.

Castor oil is amazing. It is one of those items that is always by my bed and in my bathroom. It is my go-to remedy for almost everything skin and immune related and can be viewed as an alternative to cortisone or antibiotic creams. The ricinoleic acid in castor oil prevents the growth of bacteria, yeast, and viruses. When I have joint pain anywhere, I rub it on the joints, if I have swollen glands, I massage it into neck/gland area, if I am feeling a little backed up- on to my belly it goes (massaged in a clockwise direction- the same direction stuffy moves through the large intestine). With a cold or congestion, I’ll mix in a little comfrey and eucalyptus and massage it into my chest. Be warned- it will stain your clothes so out on the old and uglies for this one.

Castor oil has many beneficial uses in health and beauty products as well as in industrial uses. Gots to be focussing on health here though, so here it goes:

Taken Internally

  • Has a laxative effect (anyone who grew up in the West Indies, India or some South American countries will likely have vile memories of lining up with their siblings to take down a spoonful of this bitterness).
  • Help the intestinal system with inflammatory bowels and dysentery.
  • It is said to increase the appetites of the ill
  • Destroy mucous to cure runny noses and congestion.

Topically

  • A castor oil soaked bandage can remove swelling and infection from any wounds includingringworm, inflammation, and  sun burns.  (The best way to use this as a topical cream is to pre soak the infected area with Epsom salt to soften the skin, then wrap the area with a cotton cloth soaked in castor oil- worked like a charm when I burnt my arm this summer).
  • Castor seeds or roots boiled into a topical poultice are applied liberally to rheumatic and arthritic swellings.
  • Massaging the body with castor oil prior to a bath once a week will help the skin retain its natural healing properties as well as stimulate the body’s muscles and internal organs.
  • Rubbing castor oil on hands and feet at night will help maintain healthy and soft skin, as well as reduce callous and dry skin.

Castor Oil Packs

And at last, my great grand-diddy of healing practices- the Castor Oil Pack! Take a cotton flannel or cloth and soak with castor oil. Apply to the skin that you wish to detoxify or increase energy flow, cover with a little plastic and then lay on a hot water bottle or heat pack. Leave it on for anywhere from 20 minutes to an hour and just chillax while this is going down. Castor oil packs soaked through the skin and improve the body’s ability to assimilate nutrients, eliminate toxins, and stimulate circulation.The castor oil pack can be repeated many times, so the pack is not thrown away. This can be done daily, three times a week- whatever floats your boat.

And here are some more pics from that beautiful garden.

Snack time!

IMG_6799
I imagine this is a large squash of some kind… but I can’t be sure. IMG_6798

Pretty as a flower. IMG_6795

Chard and Kale = Lunch time IMG_6806

Win a bag of My Favourite Granola if you can correctly identify this purple bean. Here is your clue: the beans inside were green. The first to get it right, with a source for your answer, will win the goods! IMG_6807

More to come soon. And I’ll bet you’re wondering who my wise bicycle/garden snooping companion was. He/She makes an appearance in the very first picture at top…. in the reflection of my sunglasses. Soon, soon ladies and gents.

Comments (3)
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Your blog really took me by supprise because castor beans produce ricin which is a deadly poison first used by the KGB to kill without leaving clues.  It is noncureable once taken and can be absorbed into the skin, so I am really wondering if you infact have castor beans or something else, other wise from what you said, you'd be DEAD.
thanks- the wellsphere people have been uploading my blogs as it doesn't seem to synch with wordpress.
your article is corrupt as it repeats itself several times.  fyi  :)
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