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Play It Again Week: Challenging Acceptance: The Food Guide

Posted Nov 17 2009 3:23pm

To celebrate Making Love In The Kitchen’s first birthday, the bestest posts of the last year are getting another turn in the spotlight. These were selected either because they had the most traffic or should have.While together we stroll down memory lane, I will be away on a farm with no computer! We’ll chat when I get back.
Challenging Acceptance: First Published: May 22 , 2009CFG Mcdonald's

One of my best teachers from nutrition school has a saying: “Where everyone thinks alike, no one thinks at all.”

Though generally accepted, I am not in support of Canada’s Food Guide, or the American Food Pyramid, or the whole Five-A-Day campaign that was all over the UK when I was there recently. I am really not for any generalizations around diet and I don’t think we should have to consult a chart to determine what we should be eating.

I do agree that there is big, fat, massive confusion over what is healthy, what we should eat, what we should avoid and what nutrient of the day is going to save us from our own bad habits. To follow a guide that first came out about 50 years ago and is a product of politics, lobby groups, and food industries’ best interests has done little for our health.

Industry Food Guide We have the four food groups: dairy, meat, fruit and veg, and grains.

Does this seem odd to anyone or have we just come to accept this as the way food gets grouped? Are we all thinking alike? Is dairy a fat or a protein? Are nuts a grain, a meat or a vegetable? What about sugar? What food group do we put sugar in? We do get nearly 10% of our calories from sugar. Shouldn’t sugar have a group too? Why is fish with meat? Why is fruit with vegetables? And again- what about nuts, seeds and lentils? Where do they fit in?

These generally accepted, mass market approved nutritional guidelines are recommended by doctors and dietitians, taught in school, and fully supported (and sponsored) by the milk board, cow farmers, grain farmers, and food industrialists. But do they work? Are we healthier now than we were 50 years ago, before we had these guidelines to follow? I am bringing this up now as in the last 24 hours or so, I have been challenged on the whole food nutrition I am promoting, practicing and teaching. I have been told that if I want to be successful in the nutrition field, I need to start with a generally accepted understanding of nutrition.

The challenge I have is that these guides are generally accepted, but they are not nutrition. They place equal value on a bagel and a bowl of brown rice,  a glass of skim milk and a serving of fresh vegetables.. We are warned us not to eat too much nuts or avocados because they are higher in fat content but are encouraged to go with margarine and  fat-free cheese which have nothing of nutritional value (and is gross).

The food we eat does one of two things in our body. It will build our health or build our disease. Since we all like our guides and given all the marketing around food, we could all use a little honest direction. I present to you  HonestFoodGuide.org ’s Honest Food Guide.

What are your thoughts on government directed food guides?

21407.1_HonestFoodGuide

Both The Food Guide and McDonald’s Image Courtesy of Weighty Matters at bmimedical.blogspot.com

To celebrate Making Love In The Kitchen’s first birthday, the bestest posts of the last year are getting another turn in the spotlight. These were selected either because they had the most traffic or should have.While together we stroll down memory lane, I will be away on a farm with no computer! We’ll chat when I get back.
Challenging Acceptance: First Published: May 22 , 2009CFG Mcdonald's

One of my best teachers from nutrition school has a saying: “Where everyone thinks alike, no one thinks at all.”

Though generally accepted, I am not in support of Canada’s Food Guide, or the American Food Pyramid, or the whole Five-A-Day campaign that was all over the UK when I was there recently. I am really not for any generalizations around diet and I don’t think we should have to consult a chart to determine what we should be eating.

I do agree that there is big, fat, massive confusion over what is healthy, what we should eat, what we should avoid and what nutrient of the day is going to save us from our own bad habits. To follow a guide that first came out about 50 years ago and is a product of politics, lobby groups, and food industries’ best interests has done little for our health.

Industry Food Guide We have the four food groups: dairy, meat, fruit and veg, and grains.

Does this seem odd to anyone or have we just come to accept this as the way food gets grouped? Are we all thinking alike? Is dairy a fat or a protein? Are nuts a grain, a meat or a vegetable? What about sugar? What food group do we put sugar in? We do get nearly 10% of our calories from sugar. Shouldn’t sugar have a group too? Why is fish with meat? Why is fruit with vegetables? And again- what about nuts, seeds and lentils? Where do they fit in?

These generally accepted, mass market approved nutritional guidelines are recommended by doctors and dietitians, taught in school, and fully supported (and sponsored) by the milk board, cow farmers, grain farmers, and food industrialists. But do they work? Are we healthier now than we were 50 years ago, before we had these guidelines to follow? I am bringing this up now as in the last 24 hours or so, I have been challenged on the whole food nutrition I am promoting, practicing and teaching. I have been told that if I want to be successful in the nutrition field, I need to start with a generally accepted understanding of nutrition.

The challenge I have is that these guides are generally accepted, but they are not nutrition. They place equal value on a bagel and a bowl of brown rice,  a glass of skim milk and a serving of fresh vegetables.. We are warned us not to eat too much nuts or avocados because they are higher in fat content but are encouraged to go with margarine and  fat-free cheese which have nothing of nutritional value (and is gross).

The food we eat does one of two things in our body. It will build our health or build our disease. Since we all like our guides and given all the marketing around food, we could all use a little honest direction. I present to you  HonestFoodGuide.org ’s Honest Food Guide.

What are your thoughts on government directed food guides?

21407.1_HonestFoodGuide

Both The Food Guide and McDonald’s Image Courtesy of Weighty Matters at bmimedical.blogspot.com

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