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K-Noods is short for Kelp Noodles

Posted Nov 17 2009 3:23pm

IMG_6623

What are kelp noodles? Can anyone tell me? I bought half a dozen packages of them after a friend recommended them to me. They are absolutely an awesomely odd texture somewhere between cucumber and rice noodles and apparently are all raw.  There is no cooking involved in the preparation, a little rinsing and just like that, they are ready.

I have been suspicious of this noodle since I first began experimenting with it. For starters, Kelp, a healthful sea vegetable is dark dark green, almost black in colour and kelp noodles are pretty much clear. The kelp noodle package claims its contents to be ‘a sea vegetable in the form of an easy to eat raw noodle’.  They are made of only kelp, sodium alginate (sodium salt extracted from a brown seaweed), and water. That’s it. So why are they clear and how did they get to be all noodley like? And are they actually healthy?

Over the weekend I had a conversation with some friends about this and I proposed that perhaps they were a neutral food. We decided however that there is no such thing as a neutral food (or a neutral anything in the world) and so I remain stumped. According to the package, kelp noodles are fat-free, gluten-free, and very low in carbohydrates. The noodle form has mostly a non-taste but like it’s whole form of kelp, is a rich source of trace minerals including iodine, which keeps our thyroid functioning.

While I am not sure I will replenish my stores of kelp noodles once my current supply dwindles, I will say this, I do kind of love them. As I mentioned, they have this bizarre texture and everything I have made with them has been really good.  Plus they’re raw and sometimes when you are eating raw, you need something a little more noodley than zucchini strings.

My final take-away from the Kelp Noodle experiment is simply that I have been reminded why I avoid food that comes in packages, it just makes it so complicated to know what I’m eating and how it got to look the way that it does. These are questions I don’t have to ask of a bag or brown rice of a head of broccoli.

Here is my delicious recipe for the K-Noods. Keep in mind that you can sub in any noodle, whole or sprouted grain of your choice in place of the kelp noodles

IMG_6620

Basil and Asparagus K-Noods

1/2 packet Kelp Noodles (or noodles/grain of choice)
5-8 sprigs of cauliflower (raw, or lightly steamed if you prefer)1/3 cup basil, chopped fine
1/4 cup sunflower seeds
1/2 cup cucumber, sliced into rounds and then quartered
4-5 black olives, sliced
1/2 clove garlic, minced
2 Tbs flax oil
1 Tbs lemon juice
sea salt and cayenne to taste
Pea shoots to garnish

  • Rinse help noodles thoroughly and allow to soak for about ten minutes. Drain
  • Mix all ingredients in a bowl together
  • Add kelp noodles
  • Toss and serve
  • Can store in fridge for about two days.

IMG_6623

What are kelp noodles? Can anyone tell me? I bought half a dozen packages of them after a friend recommended them to me. They are absolutely an awesomely odd texture somewhere between cucumber and rice noodles and apparently are all raw.  There is no cooking involved in the preparation, a little rinsing and just like that, they are ready.

I have been suspicious of this noodle since I first began experimenting with it. For starters, Kelp, a healthful sea vegetable is dark dark green, almost black in colour and kelp noodles are pretty much clear. The kelp noodle package claims its contents to be ‘a sea vegetable in the form of an easy to eat raw noodle’.  They are made of only kelp, sodium alginate (sodium salt extracted from a brown seaweed), and water. That’s it. So why are they clear and how did they get to be all noodley like? And are they actually healthy?

Over the weekend I had a conversation with some friends about this and I proposed that perhaps they were a neutral food. We decided however that there is no such thing as a neutral food (or a neutral anything in the world) and so I remain stumped. According to the package, kelp noodles are fat-free, gluten-free, and very low in carbohydrates. The noodle form has mostly a non-taste but like it’s whole form of kelp, is a rich source of trace minerals including iodine, which keeps our thyroid functioning.

While I am not sure I will replenish my stores of kelp noodles once my current supply dwindles, I will say this, I do kind of love them. As I mentioned, they have this bizarre texture and everything I have made with them has been really good.  Plus they’re raw and sometimes when you are eating raw, you need something a little more noodley than zucchini strings.

My final take-away from the Kelp Noodle experiment is simply that I have been reminded why I avoid food that comes in packages, it just makes it so complicated to know what I’m eating and how it got to look the way that it does. These are questions I don’t have to ask of a bag or brown rice of a head of broccoli.

Here is my delicious recipe for the K-Noods. Keep in mind that you can sub in any noodle, whole or sprouted grain of your choice in place of the kelp noodles

IMG_6620

Basil and Asparagus K-Noods

1/2 packet Kelp Noodles (or noodles/grain of choice)
5-8 sprigs of cauliflower (raw, or lightly steamed if you prefer)1/3 cup basil, chopped fine
1/4 cup sunflower seeds
1/2 cup cucumber, sliced into rounds and then quartered
4-5 black olives, sliced
1/2 clove garlic, minced
2 Tbs flax oil
1 Tbs lemon juice
sea salt and cayenne to taste
Pea shoots to garnish

  • Rinse help noodles thoroughly and allow to soak for about ten minutes. Drain
  • Mix all ingredients in a bowl together
  • Add kelp noodles
  • Toss and serve
  • Can store in fridge for about two days.
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