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Whoops One More Detail With Covering Dependents Up To Age 26- If You Are Retired This May Not Be Possible-The Exemption Algorith

Posted Oct 08 2010 9:49pm

Well at least it is working for the employed is the bright side here, but gee how much more difficult are those algorithmic formulas going to get?  Single Payer is looking better all the time. image   I said a while back that we could end up with a public or private plan by default and if this continues with mass confusion on how to interpret those algorithms and keep up with the algorithms that you need for preventive care and be able to find a family practice doctor to see you…well…just like anything else in life an alternative plan of an unknown is looking better than the crappy “known” we have now.  I truly just don’t think that having insurers on the stock exchange is healthy as it brings too many elements into healthcare and exaggerates them beyond what needs to occur and we get distracted with only looking at money and don’t perhaps improve in care as we all want to see. 

Must be one heck of an algorithmic cost processing score as big companies are jumping on to this and many are finding this to be a big disappointment.  In some instances as things stand now, the only way to get dependent coverage is through a private policy, not through many employers.

It is getting harder to stuff our needs and desires into these data tables to cross our fingers and see if we qualify.  In doing this blog there seems to be a new snag announced almost every day and with the rate at which we work and handle data, this is getting to be very time consuming.  BD

Glenn Franco was excited to hear that the new health-care law requires insurance plans to offer coverage for dependents up to age 26. But when he recently called his health-plan administrator to ask about enrolling his 24-year-old daughter, Michelle, he was told she wouldn't be eligible for the new law taking effect on Sept. 23.

The reason? He is retired.

Many large employers are telling retirees the same thing. They include Alcatel-Lucent and Verizon Communications Inc., as well as state and federal government plans and those for military families and unions.

Thanks to a little-noticed clause in a 1996 law, retiree-only health plans are exempt from the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act that went into effect last month.

That means the rule requiring health plans to extend dependent coverage to age 26, regardless of financial dependency, student status, employment or marital status, doesn't apply to millions of retirees' health benefits.

Thanks to a little-noticed clause in a 1996 law, retiree-only health plans are exempt from the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act that went into effect last month.

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