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Touch Bionics Controlled Prosthetic Hand–First Posthesis Controlled With IPhone Mobile App

Posted Apr 23 2013 12:43am

I think this is a first to have a prosthetic hand being operated with an IPhone app and if you watch the video you kind of get the idea on how this works.  The company devices have been around for a while and have connected to computers for adjusting settings, etc. but this makes is a little more convenient with the phone to actually program the phone to do some specific movements.  This is the bionic hand and allows people to use the device like a hand that connects to a computer chip to allow the hand to move and function, so now we add on the app for more settings and programming the hand.  Touch bionics makes a number of devices and you can read more here.  BD

According to Touch Bionics, the i-limb ultra revolution is the “first upper limb prosthesis that can be controlled via a mobile application.” The individually articulated fingers have variable digit-by-digit grip strength and the powered rotating thumb is controlled directly by means of skin electrodes attached to the wearer’s stump that pick up muscle impulses. These electrodes use one of four muscle impulses or triggers, which can be assigned to a particular grip or gesture – much like programming the speed dial on a phone.

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What’s novel about the i-limb ultra revolution is its Quick Grips biosim application. Compatible with iPad or iPhone, Quick Grips uses Bluetooth to link the hand to a smartphone app, which can activate 24 grip options at the tap of the screen, including standard precision pinch open, pinch closed, thumb precision pinch open, grasp and handshake. It can also be programmed by the wearer for custom grips.

Other functions of the Quick Grips app include; a collection of favorite grips that fit the wearer’s daily needs, such as typing, holding papers, or using a mouse; the Hand Health Check that activates the prosthesis diagnostic; and Training, which includes activities and games as well as providing graphical feedback of muscle control signals. There’s also a Don or Doff setting that positions the hand for putting on or removing the covering glove.

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