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Stem Cells Used to Treat Peripheral Arterial Disease–Clogged Arteries in the Legs (PAD)

Posted Aug 06 2010 12:09pm

This is a new procedure in trials and does not yet have FDA approval but it looks a image winner as does almost everything with stem cells today.  Many people suffer today from PAD and don’t know it, and you can hear the one patient state here it’s like a Charlie horse cramp in your leg.  One in every 20 of us in the US suffers from this and can lead to heart attacks. 

The video mentions too how stents are used and last year I did an interview with Cook Medical on how the stents work.  It’s worth a read too as he speaks of a procedure that takes a few minutes to run before any interventional procedures are done to find potential blockages so you don’t die on the table. 

With the stem cells you own cells are taken from your bone and put into a machine to separate and get the stem cells to inject back into the patient’s leg.  This process creates new vessels that are stronger, not blocked and pretty much cure the condition.

In one study 6 of 9 patients avoided amputation with this procedure and one woman who had the surgery said her leg pains are gone. 

Leg pain after walking is the most common symptom and if you have any of the chronic illnesses we talk about today, diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and a few more, the report says any of one or combined conditions can set you up to be a candidate for PAD.  That’s about about half or more of us I think.  BD 








LOS ANGELES (KABC) -- One in every 20 Americans over the age of 50 suffers from something called, peripheral arterial disease or PAD. It can result in clogged arteries in your legs, which can cause a heart attack, if left untreated. But now there's a new approach. Doctors using a patient's own stem cells to clear things up.

"Anybody messes with me they're going to get a big something, something," said Christina McDonald, who suffers from PAD.

McDonald, 76, can take care of herself. Her biggest threat is something she can't see -- only feel.

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