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Science Researchers Create Cells That Line Blood Vessels from iPSCs–May Lead to Patients Needing Less Blood Thinning Medic

Posted Aug 25 2013 4:07pm

iPSC cells are are wonderful thing by all means and I can go backwards here about 3 years ago when the process began whereby skin or other stem cellsimage can be changed.  As you can see from the link below intestine cells were created  and we are routinely it seems finding more and more ways to work with re-identifying cells so they function as if they were native and that’s what this story is about as well.  We all know about blood thinners, been around for years and how touchy it is to control with some like Warfarin, which we read about all the time. 

The re-identified cells perform 3 important functions that could eliminate the use of some blood thinners for those using dialysis or treatments for lung failure.  Anytime blood thinners are not needed, you are always miles ahead.  BD


In a scientific first, Harvard Stem Cell Institute scientists have successfully grown the cells that line the blood vessels—called vascular endothelial cells—from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), revealing new details about how these cells function. Using a unique approach, the researchers induced the differentiation of specific cell types by generating mechanical forces on the surface of the iPSC-derived endothelium mimicking the flow of blood. For example, cells that felt a stronger "flow" became artery cells, while those that felt a weaker "flow" became vein cells.

"It was especially exciting to us to discover that these cells are basically responding to biomechanical cues," research leader Guillermo García-Cardena, PhD, an HSCI Affiliated Faculty member, said. "By exposing cells to 'atheroprone flow,' we can direct differentiation of these cells into cells that are present in areas of the circulatory system that we know are affected by diseases like atherosclerosis." García-Cardena is now working on modeling the formation of arterial plaques using human iPSC-derived vascular endothelial cells and identifying potential drugs that might prevent plaque formation.

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