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Privacy Relative to Tracking Apps and Data Mining Legislation Will Fail If There is No Regulation Path Created–License and

Posted Jan 07 2013 1:43am

I keep reading all these items on data mining and privacy and what is missing is an avenue for regulation and something that gives law enforcement a leg to stand on.  Of course is primary due to digital illiterate lawmakers that don’t use models and a little bit of predictive modeling to see how it would all play out.  Gee is it so sad that Congress resists or brushes off looking at all sides.  I said that a while back that both sides would be much better off and they might get along better to use a tool like IBM Watson for their research and this is one reason we are all screwed as they don’t have the full understanding of what type of laws and regulations are needed.  Every time I read one of these articles on privacy legislation I just shake my head as what they propose has no teeth at all.  They just dance out it looking for some band aid legislation

Heck if they used some good research technology and everyone starts with the same numbers and same information, they might just get along better and be able to move past abortions.  I think if they could produce something that will be realistic and helpful many just might turn loose of that security blanket that we all laugh at.  In the meantime on Wall Street we can just wait around for companies like Citibank to game the weak and nonrealistic laws they come up with as they can’t model.  What in the world is wrong with a group of people we elect with using “big data” capabilities to make better laws?  They just leave themselves and the rest of us open to be “gamed”. 

This is why I started this series called the Attack of the Killer Algorithms back in October of 2011 to help educate those who don’t understand jack.  I’m up over 50 chapters now that give every day life examples on how we get “gamed” and suckered in and out.  It all started with the Occupy Movement and they themselves didn’t know exactly what was the cause but they knew things were not working and the money was vanishing into thin air. 


Now let’s go to step 2 of this process and collect some tax money as the banks, companies, social entities are making BILLIONS mining and selling data.  We keep hearing that companies are sitting on record amounts of cash, do you know why now?  There’s very little risk and cost to some IT administration infrastructure to set this up and we have “law with no balls” that do nothing to protect consumers.  As long as someone can make a buck selling data, those companies that make tangible products are at a loss as we are unbalanced.  Even some of those companies don’t expand and hire people and create factories as it is so easy to mine and sell data.

Enter the second stage of this to where the data is queried and sold as valuable analytics.  Wake up, it all does not have value but they will convince you that it does if they can make a buck.  Check out what FICO does with their medication adherence program…all there to make a buck as your credit report has nothing to do with medication adherence. 


Does FICO care if you take your medications, of course not as they want to sell the insurance and pharma business some crappy old analytics they save have value to identify the “evil twin” consumers and they will milk it to the end as bogus as it is and there’s a bunch more just like them out there.  Do they care about privacy, heck no. 

So coming back around this law needs to allow for law enforcement to have some teeth and compliance efforts as we have none now and all the current efforts are futile.  Laws with no balls.  Here’s a lady who is much smarter than me but thinks just like I do and we both do math and programming.  Listen to what she has today about the financial markets and this will help convince you even further that “privacy” is on nobody’s minds but the consumers, who don’t get it. 

This is a PBS video from Frontline.  She was a Quant at a Hedge Fund and her area to work in was predictive behaviors and futures.  She said the attitudes are we are going to take advantage because we can…listen to the video.  “If we can take advantage of pension funds, we will” she says as the attitude of the Hedge Funds.  Some of this modeling and ethics takes place with health insurance too, remember they are traded on the markets.  She was hired to find risk and nobody even used her studies and they went on with bad risks anyway. 

Watch The FRONTLINE Interview: Cathy O'Neil on PBS. See more from FRONTLINE.


So again privacy goes hand in hand with the financial markets as all the data mining and selling means money for big companies and banks.  The algorithms move the money.  This is why privacy without laws with balls will go nowhere.  Franken’s bill will not do enough.  Walgreens made short of $800 million selling data only in 2010.  We can kill two birds with one stone here and collect a whale of tax revenue.  It will help the FDA and the NIH and plenty of other areas and help redistribute the money again. 



Need more proof, read about this company and their privacy efforts..none and you as a consumer can’t see what they have on you as they are gaming the system with what type of company they are.

So there’s a lot of Algo duping going on out there and these privacy laws need to work with adding on areas to regulate and enforce, otherwise we are dead in the water.  You can read more about Algo Duping, and many University professors that understand this have told me this is right on.  So again without bringing a law model in that brings in all aspects of “privacy” the laws will have no teeth, sadly, and will be a waste of time and that’s a shame.  Congress needs to model and use technology to find more of the unintended circumstances that they can before making a law.  At what I read today and the way they are going about it without getting some technical advice, we are screwed again as business will game and profit on every bit they can.  BD   



THERE are three things that matter in consumer data collection: location, location, location.

E-ZPasses clock the routes we drive. Metro passes register the subway stations we enter. A.T.M.’s record where and when we get cash. Not to mention the credit and debit card transactions that map our trajectories in comprehensive detail — the stores, restaurants and gas stations we frequent; the hotels and health clubs we patronize.

But now legislators, regulators, advocacy groups and marketers are squaring off over newer technology: smartphones and mobile apps that can continuously record and share people’s precise movements. At issue is whether consumers are unwittingly acquiescing to pervasive tracking just for the sake of having mobile amenities like calendar, game or weather apps.

Mr. Franken’s bill may seem intended simply to protect consumer privacy. But the underlying issue is the future of consumer data property rights — the question of who actually owns the information generated by a person who uses a digital device and whether using that property without explicit authorization constitutes trespassing.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/06/technology/legislation-would-regulate-tracking-of-cellphone-users.html

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