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Prime Healthcare Defies NLRB Rulings After 3 of the President’s Recess Appointments Were Invalidated by the Court System&#

Posted Feb 01 2013 6:34pm

Oh any loophole goes today and this is what appears to be going on here with the 3 individuals no longer there and this challenge says their decisions were not good in short.  Meanwhile Prime is buying up more hospitals and we all know Prime rushes in and buys when the money’s gone.  St. Michael’s Medical Center in Newark has entered a letter of intent with Prime and is part of Catholic Healthcare East. 

Prime Healthcare Services has reached an agreement to buy Providence Medical Center in Kansas City, Kan., and Saint John Hospital in Leavenworth and both of these hospitals were in financial trouble.  Prime has been doing something a little different in providing some financial relief during the processes.  As a matter of fact the motto now for Prime is “Saving Hospitals” and keeps getting bigger. 

Back to New Jersey again, St. Mary's Hospital of Passaic, N.J., announced it has signed a binding asset purchase agreement with Prime Healthcare Services.  This brings Prime up to 22 hospital now I think plus or minus one.  In addition Prime has has their billing issues too here in California.  This is getting to be an interesting world as people and companies more than ever seem to be making their own rules today.  BD 



Prime Healthcare Services, which owns 21 hospitals in California and three other states, told Reuters on Wednesday that it had informed one of its employee unions that it would not follow an NLRB ruling mandating the collection of union dues even after a collective bargaining agreement has expired, or a ruling compelling employers to provide unions with certain materials during internal investigations.

Prime Healthcare's decision is not unprecedented, lawyers said. In some cases, when a business disagrees with a board ruling, it has chosen to not comply and to fight any resulting unfair labor practice charge brought by a union. 

Such challenges, however, usually target specific rulings. Prime Healthcare is taking the sweeping position that at least two and perhaps all the cases decided in the past year by the NLRB's recess appointees are invalid.

For Prime Healthcare, the main downside in not complying with the NLRB decisions is that it must now fight an unfair labor practice charge that SEIU filed in early January. Disputing such charges can be costly, requiring up to hundreds of lawyer hours. The union has said it intends to file a second unfair labor practice charge over the witness statements in the coming days.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/02/01/us-nlrb-hospital-idUSBRE91001320130201

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