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Outrage Over U.S. Plan To Train Offshore IT Workers–US Taxpayers Footing the Bill

Posted Aug 04 2010 11:20am

This article just goes to show what distraction, disruption and lack of focus can image bring today.  As I have mentioned before when you get non IT individuals making decision that involve IT and tech, you end up with some very strange results and this appears to be one of them.  There’s nothing wrong with creating a bigger IT knowledge around the world, but not with US Taxpayer funds and perhaps philanthropy efforts would be better in this area from private investors who can designate fund to what ever direction they desire

Right now with the focus on jobs in the US, this appears to go against the grain of what we are trying to accomplish here.  We are a generous country by all means but at a time when we are having issues like we have never faced before it might be a good time to look and see where the funds are really going and not just assume.  The US has never really had to live on a tight budget like we are now and we don’t want to fail the efforts and needs of our own citizens and invest here first. 

This article appeared in InformationWeek and you can read the full content here.  BD 

Many InformationWeek readers are against outsourcing; many are for it. But for once we seem to have found consensus on at least one aspect of this divisive issue—it's not something U.S. taxpayers should be funding.

On Tuesday I broke the truly astonishing news that USAID will spend $22 million to train students in South Asia to work in IT outsourcing, BPO, and other industries where employees will compete for jobs with American workers.

Since then, we've been flooded with feedback from a broad spectrum of readers—from Democrat to Republican and pro-business to pro-union—expressing outrage that a federal agency is providing free, hi-tech training to individuals bound for companies whose entire business model is built around luring IT work offshore.

I'm still waiting to hear back from USAID. I've asked them to justify this program to the 440,000 IT professionals who read our print magazine each week, and to the millions more we reach through InformationWeek.com. When I find out more, I'll follow up with another story. In the meantime, let's hear more of what you think.

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