Health knowledge made personal
Join this community!
› Share page:
Go
Search posts:

Delivering Vaccines: A Case Study of the Distribution System of Vaccines for Children

Posted Oct 13 2009 10:00pm

A paper written by John Fontanesi and myself was recently published in the October 2009 edition of the  American Journal of Managed Care. The paper is titled “ Delivering Vaccines: A Case Study of the Distribution System of Vaccines for Children.” The abstract of the paper is below:

Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of the central- 
ization by the Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention of their pediatric vaccine distribution 
system. 
Study Design: In March 2007, the Centers for 
Disease Control and Prevention began a pilot 
program to reform the Vaccines for Children  
(VFC) program. All California VFC providers  
were required to place vaccine orders under  
the centralized logistic system of the Vaccine  
Management Business Improvement Project 
(VMBIP). For this study, VFC ordering, use, 
and delivery data were collected from 2 large 
southern California healthcare providers that 
collectively served more than 200,000 children. 
Data collection occurred between January 2005 
and June 2008. 
Methods: This case study measures the change 
in the mean VFC delivery times before and after 
the VMBIP.  The data underwent simulation to 
estimate the number of days per year a provider 
would have zero VFC inventory before and after 
the VMBIP. 
Results: After the VMBIP was implemented, 
delivery times increased from 1.6 to 12.3 business 
days (P <.001). The probability that VFC deliveries 
took longer than 1 week increased from 7%  
before the VMBIP to 89% afterward. Our simulation 
demonstrates that for 7 of 11 vaccines investigat- 
ed there was a statistically significant increase in 
the number of days a provider would be without 
VFC (P <.01). 
Conclusion: Although the VMBIP was implement- 
ed to save costs, this study finds that during the 
VMBIP’s initial implementation timeline, providers 
experienced longer delivery delays and a higher 
probability of a VFC stockout. 
(Am J Manag Care. 2009;15(10)751-754)
  • Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of the centralization by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of their pediatric vaccine distribution system. 
  • Study Design: In March 2007, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention began a pilot program to reform the Vaccines for Children  (VFC) program. All California VFC providers  were required to place vaccine orders under  the centralized logistic system of the Vaccine  Management Business Improvement Project (VMBIP). For this study, VFC ordering, use, and delivery data were collected from 2 large southern California healthcare providers that collectively served more than 200,000 children. Data collection occurred between January 2005 and June 2008. 
  • Methods: This case study measures the change in the mean VFC delivery times before and after the VMBIP.  The data underwent simulation to estimate the number of days per year a provider would have zero VFC inventory before and after the VMBIP. 
  • Results: After the VMBIP was implemented, delivery times increased from 1.6 to 12.3 business days (P <.001). The probability that VFC deliveries took longer than 1 week increased from 7%  before the VMBIP to 89% afterward. Our simulation demonstrates that for 7 of 11 vaccines investigated there was a statistically significant increase in the number of days a provider would be without VFC (P <.01)
  • Conclusion: Although the VMBIP was implemented to save costs, this study finds that during the VMBIP’s initial implementation timeline, providers experienced longer delivery delays and a higher probability of a VFC stockout. 

( Am J Manag Care. 2009;15(10)751-754 )

Post a comment
Write a comment: