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'Dead Peasant' Life Insurance Policies - Human Hedge Funds The Next Bond Issues

Posted Oct 04 2009 10:01pm

Not too long ago I wrote about the next step that migrates from “dead peasant” life insurance policies, which was shown in Michael Moore’s new film.  Yes, it is moving up the ladder to even another level of gambling.  The video below explains the dead peasant life insurance policies, but continue on and read the link below to find out about the Human Hedge Funds.  Are investors going to get impatient if you live too long?

Again the “Dead Peasant” life policies are bad enough, but the Human Hedge Funds have a lot of potential bad turns that could take place if an individual were placed in a “diseased” group of bonds with investors looking over their shoulders on how long they take to pass away from their disease.  BD 

If You Think The “So Called Death Panels” are Something To Worry About – Read This and Get Educated

From the link above:

“The solution? A bond made up of life settlements would ideally have policies from people with a range of diseases — leukemia, lung cancer, heart disease, breast cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer’s. That is because if too many people with leukemia are in the securitization portfolio, and a cure is developed, the value of the bond would plummet.”

Just think, you may have to be suffering from some major disease, breast cancer, diabetes, etc. before you could have the opportunity too as there will be a bunch of investors looking over your shoulder wondering how long it’s going to take for you to check out so they can see a return on their money.  I don’t care about other types of investments and the algorithms they run, but when it comes to healthcare and human lives it should be open source so we can all see how we are graded or scored and what parameters, data arrays, etc. are used.”

 

So when Irma Johnson learned that her husband, Daniel, who died of brain cancer, had been insured for $1.5 million, it should have been at least a small comfort.

But she did not receive the money. His employer did.

Betina Tillman felt shocked and deceived when a reporter from The Wall Street Journal told her that her brother, a music store cashier, was insured by his employer for $339,000 when he died, despite the fact that he no longer worked at the store.

ABC News: Are 'Dead Peasant' Life Insurance Policies Fair? | Video Cafe

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