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Baby Slings & Baby Carriers

Posted Oct 11 2011 10:45pm
source: Health Canada www.hc-sc.gc.caThe use of baby slings and baby carriers (worn by the caregiver) has led to serious injuries, and in some cases, the death of babies in Canada. Slings that use knots or rings to hold the two ends of fabric together pose a potential safety risk because knots can come loose and fabric can slip through the ring, causing the baby to fall. It is important to choose the right sling or carrier for you and the baby. When choosing a baby sling or baby carrier, look for a model that: is appropriate for the age and size of the baby and that it can accommodate the growth of the baby. is the appropriate size for the adult carrying the baby. comes with detailed and easy to understand instructions. Follow them carefully and keep for future use. will not allow the baby to slip through the leg openings or fall over the side of the product. comes with safety straps. Make sure that they are always securely fastened. Before each use, check for ripped seams and other signs of wear that may make the product unsafe. Take caution when bending over, hold onto the baby with one hand and bend at the knees, to prevent the baby from slipping out of the sling or carrier.Baby WalkersBaby walkers are banned in Canada. It is a criminal offence to sell, advertise, or import new or used baby walkers, even for your own use. It is also a criminal offence to give them away.Blind and Curtain CordsThere is a possible strangulation or entanglement hazard for babies and young children who have access to looped or long blind and curtain cords. There are steps you can take to reduce the risk of this type of tragedy from happening in your home.Whether your blinds or curtains are new or old, do not leave cords hanging. Keep the cords high and out of the reach of children. Cut the cords short when blinds are fully down or when curtains are fully closed. Tie the cords out of the reach of children, whether the blind is up or down, make sure children cannot reach the cords. Never put a crib, bed, high chair or playpen near a window or a patio door where a child can reach a blind or curtain cord.Use a clip, clothes pin, or big twist tie to keep the cord high and out of reach of childrenUse a clip, clothes pin, or a big twist tie to keep the cord high and out of the reach of children.Wrap the cord around a cleat or two nails or screws that you have attached to the wall near the top of the blinds or curtains, high and out of the reach of children.Wrap the cord around a cleat or two nails or screws that you have attached to the wall near the top of the blinds or curtains, high and out of the reach of children.Remove the loop in the cord by cutting the cord in half.Remove the loop in the cord by cutting the cord in half. Then, put plastic tassels or a break-away device at the end of the cords.Install tie-downs for vertical blinds.Install tie-downs for vertical blinds. You can buy these devices at hardware or department stores. When installing tie-downs, follow the manufacturer's instructions that come with the product. Make sure that the tie-down device is securely attached to the wall beside the window. Do not put sofas, chairs, tables, shelves or bookcases near windows. This will prevent children from climbing up to reach the blind or curtain cord.Bunk BedsChildren under 6 years of age should never use the upper bunk of bunk beds.Since 1985, a number of deaths were reported in Canada when children under 6 years of age were placed in the upper bunk. Typically, the children suffocated when their bodies slipped between the guard rail and the mattress. Check regularly to make sure the frame of the bed is sturdy and in good condition. Make sure the upper bunk has guard rails on all sides even if the bed is placed against a wall. Make sure the spaces in the guard rail are small enough so that a child cannot slip through. Mattresses should fit snugly on all sides leaving no gaps between the mattress and the sides of the bed. See also Safe Sleep.Health Canada recommends the use of bunk beds that meet the requirements of the current ASTM International bunk bed standards. Know before you buy; check the label, visit the manufacturer's Web site, or ask your retailer, to find out if the bunk bed you have selected meets these standards.
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