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Turning Cervical Cancer into an Infectious Disease

Posted Nov 29 2010 9:48am

November 29, 2010. North Hollywood, CA. In February of 2010, an article appeared inJ Epidemiol Community Healthtitled:“Assessing the effectiveness of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination to prevent cervical cancer: perspectives from Germany”blatantly refers to converting cervical cancer from a oncological disease into an infectious disease.The article was written byProfessor Martina Doren, with the Clinical Research Center of Women’s Health at Charite´-Universita¨tsmedizin in Berlin. 

 

“For approximately 2 years now, cervical cancer has been “converted” from an oncological disease to an infectious disease, which is said to be preventable by and large by two vaccines licensed in many countries. However, human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines differ from existing others, as the former target a condition which only in a minute fraction of infections will lead to serious consequences, but after a long(er) latency period. Furthermore, it should be kept in mind that in clinical trials, the quadrivalent vaccine was tested in fewer than 1200 girls 16 years and younger.” 

 

Sane Vax Inc., wants to know the science behind the conversion. 

 

In all her candor Professor Doren cited data as to what fraction of cervical intraepithelial lesions (CIN) grade 2 or worse and cancer incidence, respectively, are indeed prevented in young girls not infected with any HPV type prior immunisation for periods beyond two years. 

 

“In spring 2006, an analysis of vaccine efficacy against CIN 2+ due to any HPV type among subgroup of girls/women (per protocol population) for all four vaccine-relevant HPV types showed an observed reduction of (only) 16.9% regarding these lesions 3 (for a discussion of published efficacy data in Germany, see also Gerhardus et al).” 4 

 

Dr. Doren continues with a concern the SaneVax Team has…that even though human papillomavirus passes through 90% of women’s in a two year time period, the HPV vaccines may be marketed as an ill-founded “magic bullet” just as HRT was pushed on unsuspecting, ill-informed menopausal women. 

 

“Thus, the efficacy of the licensed vaccines to prevent cervical cancer is unknown; in other words, it is unknown whether vaccinations are indeed a “magic bullet,” a term also used recently to re-evaluate menopausal hormone therapy, the benefits of which were not “magic” after all. Perhaps the magic of female nature in this case is that most infections (approximately 90%) are dealt with very effectively and permanently in immunocompetent (young) women. Therefore, girls/women with HPV infections are highly unlikely to develop invasive cervical cancer. This is crucial risk information not transported affirmatively by various parties actively promoting HPV vaccination. 6 

 

In her closing statement, Dr. Doren states: “Thus, we are not able to appraise the contribution of HPV vaccines to decrease the burden of cervical cancer today in Germany.” 

 

Compare Dr. Doren’s timely remarks and concerns to a statement made byProfessor Raina MacIntyre,in a November 15, 2005 article titled:Dr. Ian Frazer’s excellent adventure  "

 

As to parental acceptance of vaccinating children against what is essentially a sexually transmitted infection, a lot will depend on how the vaccine is marketed. If it is marketed as a cancer preventing vaccine, there won’t be as much resistance." 

 

So, if parents are wary of vaccinating their children against sexually transmitted infection – and if Cervarix and Gardasil are marketed as “cancer preventing vaccines,” then, acceptance and uptake numbers might become more impressive. It appears to the SaneVax Team the magic bullet in this case is the conversion of cervical cancer into a sexually transmitted disease. It provided the perfect marketing strategy. 

 

Too bad the science evidence does not back up the conversion.     

 

Obviously, the public is seeing through the “magic bullet” concept.   On November 23, 2010, the American Medical News released an article with reference to the University of Maryland study recommending that‘counseling’   helps women start and complete the HPV regimen.According to data released from the University of Maryland Medical Center, only 30% who begin the three-dose HPV vaccine series actually complete it .  Between August 2006 and August 2010, 9,658 outpatient females ages 9 to 26 were surveyed. The data showed that only 27.3% of the women received at least one dose of the HPV vaccine. 

 

“Of those individuals, 39.1% got only a single dose and 30.1% received two doses.   The remaining 30.8% completed the three-dose series.

 


TheSaneVax Team    objects to additional pressure placed on adolescents for administration of   a potentially dangerous vaccine whose safety and efficacy has not been established outside of a clinical trial on ‘healthy adolescent girls,” for strains of a virus not yet proven to cause cervical cancer.  

Globally, researchers, doctors, educators, politicians and the public have seen through the HPV magic bullet marketing campaign.   It is time for the pharmaceutical companies and the government to acknowledge the flaws in the scientific development of these vaccines and remove them from the market until their safety and efficacy has been proven and a causal relationship between HPV and cervical cancer has been firmly established. 

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