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Why do we feel pain?

Posted Sep 28 2010 8:45am

I was just reading an article about the cause of migraine headaches.  Researches think they have found a gene that causes migraines.  They are going to try and develop a drug to lower the body’s ability to feel pain.  This made me think, why do we feel pain in the first place?  Well, here is my answer.

We feel pain because it is our body’s way of telling us there is something wrong.  Pain is actually a really good teacher about what not to do in the future.  If you constantly did something that caused pain that would seem a little silly.  Let’s attack this from a couple of different angles.  The first angle will be mechanical pain.  Something you do to injury yourself.  Ok, say you are lifting something that is far to heavy.  You bend at the waist and try to lift only to find your lower back starting to hurt.  You try to stand up straight and you can’t.  A massive discovery has been made.  One, you cannot lift that much weight and two, lift with your knees bend and not with your back.  However, I have seen many people do this many times so maybe this is a bad example.

Let’s try this mechanical idea again.  You start jogging and you go 5 miles the first day.  You body cannot function the next day because of soreness and stiffness.  Now if you only went about a quarter of a mile you wouldn’t have felt that same pain.  You’re body can tell you what it can and can’t handle.

Now we are going to move on to different food and how that can influence pain.  Take such as when you drink too much alcohol.  You become “intoxicated” and start to feel sick.  This is a purely defensive mechanism by the body to protect itself from dying!  An intoxicated person that is beyond the body’s ability to filter the alcohol will vomit in attempt to rid the body of excess acidity that is accumulating in the blood.  This will have dramatic effects on how we feel, especially in the morning when vitamins, minerals, water, and protein has been vastly depleted within the body.

There are also chronic pain patterns.  These patterns are often a result of degenerative disease, problems with cranial-sacral respiration, and long-term subluxation patterns that have not been address.  There is far more here to discuss than this blog is going to go into.


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