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Why Do I Need a 60cc Syringe?

Posted Aug 07 2009 7:16pm

For many medical situations, G-Tubes or Gastrostomy Tubes, or N-G tubes (naso-gastric which means starting in your nose and ending in your stomach), j-g tubes (starting AFTER your stomach) are life saving!

While feeding blended meals via g-tube requires the use of syringes since pumps cannot process the thicker food, G-Tube fed people who stick with formula and pumps need to have some large syringes on hand. 60 cc or 2 ounce syringes come in very handy.  In our situation we can use either a luer lock or catheter tip syringe – both work on the extension tube ports for “Little Miss”.  Sometimes a luer lock seems better because it doesn’t pop out or leak as easily.  We use 10 cc (2 teaspoons) syringes for giving medicine.

The larger syringes – either 35 cc or 60 cc – work well for giving water or Pedialyte.  We give either or both when Little Miss has been sick.  We had to give up on the pumps because our girlie-girl moves around so much all day AND all night.

Another reason to have a large syringe on hand is to deal with clogged  g-tubes. Reverse pressure with a large syringe is much higher pressure than with a small syringe.  By reverse pressure, I mean attaching an empty syringe to the extension tube and pulling BACK on the syringe plunger in order to pull out whatever is clogging things up.  This has worked very well in our experience.

Additionally, if the power goes out and you do not have adequate batteries, being able to feed via syringe is a great help!  Your durable medical goods supplier will be the place to contact for 60 cc syringes.

For many medical situations, G-Tubes or Gastrostomy Tubes, or N-G tubes (naso-gastric which means starting in your nose and ending in your stomach), j-g tubes (starting AFTER your stomach) are life saving!

While feeding blended meals via g-tube requires the use of syringes since pumps cannot process the thicker food, G-Tube fed people who stick with formula and pumps need to have some large syringes on hand. 60 cc or 2 ounce syringes come in very handy.  In our situation we can use either a luer lock or catheter tip syringe – both work on the extension tube ports for “Little Miss”.  Sometimes a luer lock seems better because it doesn’t pop out or leak as easily.  We use 10 cc (2 teaspoons) syringes for giving medicine.

The larger syringes – either 35 cc or 60 cc – work well for giving water or Pedialyte.  We give either or both when Little Miss has been sick.  We had to give up on the pumps because our girlie-girl moves around so much all day AND all night.

Another reason to have a large syringe on hand is to deal with clogged  g-tubes. Reverse pressure with a large syringe is much higher pressure than with a small syringe.  By reverse pressure, I mean attaching an empty syringe to the extension tube and pulling BACK on the syringe plunger in order to pull out whatever is clogging things up.  This has worked very well in our experience.

Additionally, if the power goes out and you do not have adequate batteries, being able to feed via syringe is a great help!  Your durable medical goods supplier will be the place to contact for 60 cc syringes.

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